The lingerie factory was opened in the West Bank in the 1980s in an attempt to develop the Palestinian economy. The factory was shut in 1990 amid bouts of West Bank violence and troubles with Israeli military regulations. Racks of robes and camisoles still hang in the production room. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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An Israeli-Palestinian Battle With Roots In Lingerie

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A cart in the garden of the U.S. Consulate in Jerusalem displays produce grown in Gaza: tomatoes, sweet potatoes, eggplant, sweet and hot peppers, green onions and herbs. Like all products leaving Gaza, this shipment needed Israeli approval. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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The mother (right) of Abdel Hamid Abu Srour (portrait) mourns with family members as she receives condolences at the Al-Ruwad Center in the Aida Refugee Camp near Bethlehem on Friday. Musa Al Shaer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Is This Week's Jerusalem Suicide Bombing A Warning Of More To Come?

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Arab-Israeli colleagues react to the departure of the last Palestinian SodaStream employees from the company's plant in the Israeli city of Rahat on Feb. 29. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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When 500 Palestinians Lose Their Jobs At SodaStream, Who's To Blame?

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The Waze navigation app has an option to "avoid dangerous areas," meaning areas Israel does not legally allow its citizens to go. This mechanism was disabled on the phones of the Israeli soldiers who strayed into a Palestinian refugee camp. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Israeli soldiers stand guard on the main road during the funeral of Dalia Lemkus on Nov. 11, 2014. Lemkus, who lived in the West Bank Jewish settlement of Tekoa, was killed in a stabbing attack. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

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In The West Bank, Barriers Don't Necessarily Make Good Neighbors

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Palestinian activist Issa Amro advocates nonviolence in the West Bank city of Hebron. He recently talked a teenage girl out of an attack, but acknowledges it can be difficult to persuade young Palestinians to his position. In the background, Israeli soldiers patrol an olive tree grove next to his home, which the army has declared off-limits to non-residents. Daniel Estrin for NPR hide caption

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In Hebron, A City Hit Hard By Violence, A Palestinian Preaches Nonviolence

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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has blasted the European Union plan to begin labeling products produced in Israeli settlements. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

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At Rukab's Ice Cream Parlor in downtown Ramallah, servers can stretch some flavors over a foot. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Gooey Goodness: Ramallah's Stretchy Ice Cream Delights

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The Weinfeld Family, 2009. Photographer Frederic Brenner, who took this photo, created This Place, an exhibit that features the work of 12 internationally acclaimed photographers in Israel and the West Bank. Frederic Brenner/Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery hide caption

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Israel And The West Bank Through Fresh Eyes

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The indictment against 24-year-old Palestinian Ayman Mahareeq says comments he posted on Facebook illegally insulted the West Bank police force and the Palestinian Authority, which governs the West Bank. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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In The West Bank, Facebook Posts Can Get You Arrested, Or Worse

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For many commuters, standing in the parking lot after driving to work wouldn't be noteworthy. But for rheumatologist Anas Muhana, it's a big deal. He's one of only 100 Palestinian West Bank residents now permitted to drive his own car, with its white-and-green plates, to his job in Israel. The Israeli military banned Palestinian-plated cars for the past 15 years. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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With Small Shifts, Israel Eases Restrictions On Some Palestinians

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