Airlines Airlines

A board at Heathrow Airport in London displays a slew of cancellations for British Airways flights on Saturday. An IT systems failure laid waste to flyers' plans at the U.K.'s two major airports over the weekend, and the situation is yet to be completely resolved as of Monday. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

Brian Schear, seen here during an argument with Delta staff, says he and his family were forced off a flight from Maui because they put their 2-year-old in a seat Schear had bought for a different child. YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee ranking member Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., questions witnesses Tuesday during a hearing about about oversight of U.S. airline customer service. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Delta recently authorized supervisors to offer up to $9,950 in compensation to passengers bumped from flights. A Delta Air Lines jet sits at a gate at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Flight Overbooked? Perfect: These Frequent Flyers Want To Get Bumped

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The fiasco with a United passenger being dragged off a plane illustrates the problem of enticing people to voluntarily give up their seats. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

The United Airlines Fiasco: How Game Theory Could Help

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United Airlines airplanes sit on the tarmac March 15 at LaGuardia Airport in New York. The company is struggling with the public relations fallout from its violent removal of one of its passengers. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

How To Not Get Bumped From A Flight, And What You're Entitled To If You Are

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Passengers at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport wait in line for security screening in May 2016. A study released Monday found that U.S. airline quality is higher than ever, but air travelers may disagree. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Passengers check in for flights with United Airlines at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. United, American and Delta now offer no-frills "basic economy" fares. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

New 'Basic Economy' Airfares May Not Be As Cheap As You Think

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President Trump's executive order is particularly difficult for airlines based in the Middle East, which have to check the birthplaces of all their crew members. Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ishara S. Kodikara/AFP/Getty Images

After Travel Ban, Airlines Scramble To Reroute Crew Members

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The Obama administration is proposing new rules to address passenger complaints about airline service. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

New Rules Would Require Airlines To Refund Baggage Fees For Delayed Luggage

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Jon Feingersh/Getty Images/Blend Images RM

'The Travel Detective' Explains How Airlines Became A 'Mafia'

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Passengers wait at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport after a computer systems failure on Monday caused Delta to delay or cancel hundreds of flights. Branden Camp/AP hide caption

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Branden Camp/AP

Why The Airline Industry Could Keep Suffering System Failures Like Delta's

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Passengers walk across the tarmac at Jose Marti International Airport after arriving on a charter plane operated by American Airlines January 19, 2015, in Havana, Cuba. The Department of Transportation has approved scheduled flights from the U.S. to Cuba, including some operated by American — though no flights to Havana have yet been authorized. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Khairuldeen Makhzoomi (left) came to the U.S. as an Iraqi refugee and says he was recently unfairly removed from a flight. Haven Daley/AP hide caption

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Haven Daley/AP

'Flying While Muslim': Profiling Fears After Arabic Speaker Removed From Plane

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E-cigarette vaporizers are displayed at Digital Ciggz in San Rafael, Calif. The Department of Transportation says you definitely can't use this or anything else to vape on a plane. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Pakistani police stand guard as a Pakistan International Airline plane taxis on a runway in Islamabad on Feb. 8. The national carrier has struggled in recent years with a $3 billion debt. Farooq Naeem/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Farooq Naeem/AFP/Getty Images

Once Pakistan's Pride, Its Embattled National Airline Fights To Survive

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Passengers walk through the terminal as they head to their flights at Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va., on Dec. 23, 2015. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

As Oil Plummets, Cheap Jet Fuel Means Better Travel Deals

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Tourists wait to visit the Louvre as it reopens in Paris on Monday. As the city tries to recover from Friday's attacks, people who planned to travel there seem to be conflicted about whether to go. Xy Jinquan/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Xy Jinquan/Xinhua/Landov

Paris Attacks Create A Dilemma For Travelers

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