Airlines Airlines

Fuel prices have plummeted this year, but airfares have remained high. The International Air Transport Association estimates that the world's airlines will rake in nearly $20 billion in profits this year. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

The Year In Air Travel: Packed Planes And More Perks — For A Price

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Cho Hyun-ah, the daughter of Korean Air's chairman and CEO, has apologized and resigned from a position at the airline after a backlash over her kicking a steward off a recent flight. Cho was angered by the presentation of macadamia nuts. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

A plane takes off over a departure board at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport in Atlanta last November. Airlines say they expect an uptick in Thanksgiving travel this year. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

The good old days: A flight attendant serves coffee and sandwiches to a passenger on board an American Airlines flight, circa 1935. Frederic Lewis/Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic Lewis/Archive Photos/Getty Images

Malaysia Airlines had been struggling even before two of its flights were lost this year. Analysts say the national carrier faces either bankruptcy or privatization. Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohd Rasfan/AFP/Getty Images

After Two Disasters, Can Malaysia Airlines Still Attract Passengers?

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The Air Force's U-2 spy plane first took flight in August 1955. One of the planes confused air traffic control computers in California last week, creating havoc. USAF/Getty Images hide caption

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USAF/Getty Images

The charred tail section of Delta Flight 191 sits near a runway at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in August 1985 after it crashed on approach. Delta quickly retired the "191" designation. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP