Khairuldeen Makhzoomi (left) came to the U.S. as an Iraqi refugee and says he was recently unfairly removed from a flight. Haven Daley/AP hide caption

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'Flying While Muslim': Profiling Fears After Arabic Speaker Removed From Plane
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E-cigarette vaporizers are displayed at Digital Ciggz in San Rafael, Calif. The Department of Transportation says you definitely can't use this or anything else to vape on a plane. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Pakistani police stand guard as a Pakistan International Airline plane taxis on a runway in Islamabad on Feb. 8. The national carrier has struggled in recent years with a $3 billion debt. Farooq Naeem/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Once Pakistan's Pride, Its Embattled National Airline Fights To Survive
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Passengers walk through the terminal as they head to their flights at Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va., on Dec. 23, 2015. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As Oil Plummets, Cheap Jet Fuel Means Better Travel Deals
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Tourists wait to visit the Louvre as it reopens in Paris on Monday. As the city tries to recover from Friday's attacks, people who planned to travel there seem to be conflicted about whether to go. Xy Jinquan/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Paris Attacks Create A Dilemma For Travelers
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United Airlines planes sit on the tarmac at San Francisco International Airport on July 8, grounded by a computer glitch. Some 3,500 United passengers around the world were delayed. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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United Airlines Faces Steep Ascent In Not-So-Friendly Skies
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Report: Mergers Have Cut Airline Competition At Many Airports, Raising Fares
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A plane takes off from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport on May 25. Airports want Congress to raise passenger fees to pay for improvements. Trevor Collens/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Qatar Airways plane loads cargo on Feb. 3, 2013, at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The big three U.S. airlines — Delta, United and American — say Persian Gulf carriers like Qatar Airways, Emirates Airlines and Etihad are "dumping" seats in the U.S. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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When it comes to an employee's mental health status, what does an employer need to know, or have a right to know? iStockphoto hide caption

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Germanwings Crash Highlights Workplace Approaches To Mental Health
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A Southwest Airlines pilot and co-pilot preparing for a flight from Dallas last year. In the wake of the Germanwings crash this week, many European airlines are rushing to adopt a two-person cockpit rule similar to the one already in place in the U.S. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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