Afaf Shini, a host on the Palestine 48 TV channel, holds a reading card with the satellite channel's logo during a morning broadcast in Ramallah in July. Israel shut down operations just days after the launch. Nasser Nasser/AP hide caption

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In The West Bank, A Rough Start Doesn't Deter New Arab TV Channel

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In a village outside of Jenin, in the West Bank, Palestinian farmers harvest wheat early and burn the husks to yield the smoky, nutty grain known as freekeh. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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Haneen Radi, an Arab Israeli, wants to organize a marathon for her town of Tira, but was told the run couldn't include women. When she insisted, she received threats, and the back window of her car was shot out. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Trying To Organize A Marathon, An Arab-Israeli Woman Runs Into Opposition

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FIFA President Sepp Blatter kicks a ball during the inauguration of a football stadium in the village of Dura al-Qari near the West Bank city of Ramallah on Wednesday. Blatter said he is on a "mission of peace" to resolve tensions between the Israeli and Palestinian soccer federations. Majdi Mohammed/AP hide caption

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For Israel, Soccer Becomes A Geopolitical Football

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Menachem Zivotofsky and his father, Ari Zivotofsky, gather to speak to media outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Monday. The court is taking its second look at a dispute over the wording of U.S. passports for Americans born in Jerusalem, a case with potential foreign policy implications. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Supreme Court Case Tests Status Of Jerusalem

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An Israeli couple, Noga and Moshiko Siho, kiss after they have their wedding photos taken Wednesday in an army staging area on the Israel-Gaza border, near Kibbutz Yad Mordechai, Israel. Oded Balilty/AP hide caption

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A Palestinian boy, hoping to cross into Egypt with his family, is held by his mother as they wait at the Rafah crossing between Egypt and the southern Gaza Strip on Tuesday. A cease-fire between Israel and Hamas held for a second day Tuesday as officials from both sides held indirect talks in Egypt. Ramadan el-Agha/APA /Landov hide caption

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The Palestinian sister of Mohammed al-Daeri, 25, mourns during his funeral in Gaza City on Thursday. Mahmud Hams /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Conflict In Gaza: What You Need To Know Today

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