Colombians celebrate in Bogota on Wednesday as they watch on a giant screen broadcasting the signing of a peace agreement between the Colombian Government and the FARC in Havana. Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebels of the 48th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia walk on a makeshift footbridge in the southern jungles of Putumayo on Aug. 12. On Wednesday, it was announced that the FARC and the Colombian government had reached a deal to end their decades-long conflict. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Venezuelans wait in San Antonio del Tachira, Venezuela, to cross the border with Colombia during a rare 12-hour opening Sunday. Thousands of Venezuelans crossed to buy food and medicine. George Castellanos/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Colombia-Venezuela Border: Open To Smugglers, Closed To The Desperate

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Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (left) and FARC commander Timoleon Jimenez (right) shake hands as Raul Castro looks on at a signing ceremony of a cease-fire deal in Havana last Thursday. "It is the first time ever that a guerrilla group lays down its arms to submit to a justice system where they are going to be investigated, judged, and condemned and sanctioned," Santos told NPR. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Colombia's President: Making Peace With Rebels Is 'A Good Investment'

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A wreath placed before the statue of Simón Bolívar in Bogota's main square celebrates the peace accord between the Colombian government and the FARC leftist guerrilla group. The ribbon on the wreath says "Farewell to War" in Spanish; the sign beneath reads "R.I.P. War in Colombia." Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Parakeets are among Colombia's 1,900 bird species. Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr hide caption

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As Colombia Grows Safer, Tourists — Especially Bird Lovers — Flock Back

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Researcher Beatriz Parra Patino (right) prepares to test the blood and urine of patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome to see if they had Zika virus as well. She's been working seven days a week, up to 14 hours a day, to test samples as quickly as possible. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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The Answer To A Zika Mystery Could Lie In Test Tubes In Colombia

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Protected from bites by a mosquito net, this pregnant woman, in her second trimester, came into the hospital in Cucuta, Colombia, with symptoms of Zika. A blood test is being run to find out if she has the virus. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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All Eyes Are On Colombia: Will Zika Trigger A Spike In Microcephaly?

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These people have just walked across the bridge from Venezuela to Colombia, where the Colombian immigration authorities are on duty. Many people live on one side and work on the other, crossing so frequently they don't have to register with officials each time. Vladimir Solano for NPR hide caption

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Venezuela Won't Talk To Colombia About Zika — And That's A Problem

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The man in the T-shirt is Paolo Sandoval, 42. His wife (seated, far right, in a white shirt) is Jessica Vivana Torres, 30. She's 15 weeks pregnant with their first child and came down with Zika three weeks ago. "I'm really worried about brain damage in the baby," says Sandoval, who listens intently as the ultrasound doctor describes the procedure. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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With Zika Looming, What's It Like At A Maternity Clinic In Colombia?

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A Spanish galleon is seen here in an artist's depiction of trade on the high seas in the 16th century. Colombia says it's found a galleon from 1708 that is believed to hold billions of dollars' worth of treasure. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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After the funeral in 2013 for popular folk music star Diomedes Diaz, fellow musicians including accordionist Andres Gil performed in homage to him. Now Colombia's Congress is considering a bill to honor Diaz. Ricardo Mazalan/AP hide caption

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Will Colombia Honor A Beloved Musician Who Was Also A Convicted Killer?

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A tattoo artist works in London in 2014. This September, a Colombian organization is offering to edit erroneous tattoos — free — and hopefully interest young people in the value of good grammar and spelling. Oli Scarff/Getty Images hide caption

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This is one of 12 rain forest landscapes by Abel Rodriguez, part of his ink-and-watercolor series Ciclo anual del bosque de la vega (Seasonal changes in the flooded rain forest). Abel Rodriguez/Courtesy of Tropenbos International, Colombia hide caption

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Fibers from the fique plant, dyed with natural pigments by artist Susana Mejia, are part of the Waterweavers exhibit. In the photo above, the fibers hang to dry in the Amazon jungle. Jorge Montoya hide caption

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Colombia's Nairo Quintana, wearing the best young rider's white jersey,crosses the finish line of the 19th stage of the 2015 Tour de France on Friday. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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The Cycling World May Soon Bow Down Before Nairo Quintana

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A plane sprays coca fields in San Miguel, Colombia, in 2006. The Colombian government announced this week that it is phasing out the U.S.-backed aerial coca-eradication program over health concerns. William Fernando Martinez/AP hide caption

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Colombia Will End Coca Crop-Dusting, Citing Health Concerns

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A Colombian soldier searches for land mines laid by rebel fighters. RAUL ARBOLEDA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Second Most Dangerous Country For Land Mines Begins To De-Mine

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