Colombians in the capital, Bogota, hold up the letters for "peace" in Spanish on Monday. The Colombian government and FARC rebels signed a peace agreement, marking an end to the last war in the Western Hemisphere. Colombia's civil war lasted more than 50 years and Latin America has had civil wars for the past six decades. Jennifer Alarcon/AP hide caption

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U.S. envoy Bernard Aronson speaks at the State Department in Washingon on Feb. 20, 2015. Secretary of State John Kerry said Aronson announced that Aronson would be the special envoy to Colombia, where he helped negotiate an end to that country's 52-year war. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The American Diplomat Who Helped Bring An End To Colombia's War

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Sebastian Marroquin, son of Colombia's late drug lord Pablo Escobar, spends much of his time barnstorming across Latin America as a motivational speaker, denouncing the illegal drug trade and his father's ultra-violent ways. "I feel I have a moral responsibility to go before society, recognize my father's crimes and to apologize to the victims of these crimes," Marroquín tells NPR. Eduardo Di Baia/AP images hide caption

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Renouncing Pablo Escobar's Sins, His Son Trafficks In Motivational Talks

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A mural in the town of Toribio, Colombia, displays an idyllic rural scene. But the reality is that many rural parts of the country are desperately poor and lawless. Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Colombians celebrate in Bogota on Wednesday as they watch on a giant screen broadcasting the signing of a peace agreement between the Colombian Government and the FARC in Havana. Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebels of the 48th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia walk on a makeshift footbridge in the southern jungles of Putumayo on Aug. 12. On Wednesday, it was announced that the FARC and the Colombian government had reached a deal to end their decades-long conflict. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Venezuelans wait in San Antonio del Tachira, Venezuela, to cross the border with Colombia during a rare 12-hour opening Sunday. Thousands of Venezuelans crossed to buy food and medicine. George Castellanos/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Colombia-Venezuela Border: Open To Smugglers, Closed To The Desperate

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Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (left) and FARC commander Timoleon Jimenez (right) shake hands as Raul Castro looks on at a signing ceremony of a cease-fire deal in Havana last Thursday. "It is the first time ever that a guerrilla group lays down its arms to submit to a justice system where they are going to be investigated, judged, and condemned and sanctioned," Santos told NPR. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Colombia's President: Making Peace With Rebels Is 'A Good Investment'

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A wreath placed before the statue of Simón Bolívar in Bogota's main square celebrates the peace accord between the Colombian government and the FARC leftist guerrilla group. The ribbon on the wreath says "Farewell to War" in Spanish; the sign beneath reads "R.I.P. War in Colombia." Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Parakeets are among Colombia's 1,900 bird species. Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr hide caption

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Alexander Schimmeck /Flickr

As Colombia Grows Safer, Tourists — Especially Bird Lovers — Flock Back

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Researcher Beatriz Parra Patino (right) prepares to test the blood and urine of patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome to see if they had Zika virus as well. She's been working seven days a week, up to 14 hours a day, to test samples as quickly as possible. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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The Answer To A Zika Mystery Could Lie In Test Tubes In Colombia

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Protected from bites by a mosquito net, this pregnant woman, in her second trimester, came into the hospital in Cucuta, Colombia, with symptoms of Zika. A blood test is being run to find out if she has the virus. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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All Eyes Are On Colombia: Will Zika Trigger A Spike In Microcephaly?

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These people have just walked across the bridge from Venezuela to Colombia, where the Colombian immigration authorities are on duty. Many people live on one side and work on the other, crossing so frequently they don't have to register with officials each time. Vladimir Solano for NPR hide caption

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Venezuela Won't Talk To Colombia About Zika — And That's A Problem

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The man in the T-shirt is Paolo Sandoval, 42. His wife (seated, far right, in a white shirt) is Jessica Vivana Torres, 30. She's 15 weeks pregnant with their first child and came down with Zika three weeks ago. "I'm really worried about brain damage in the baby," says Sandoval, who listens intently as the ultrasound doctor describes the procedure. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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With Zika Looming, What's It Like At A Maternity Clinic In Colombia?

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