Colombia Colombia

Brazil's Chapecoense players pose for pictures during their 2016 Copa Sudamericana semifinal against Argentina's San Lorenzo in Chapeco, Brazil, on Nov. 23. Most of the players on the team died in a plane crash in Colombia late Monday. Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

People wait at the border in Maicao, Colombia, just across from Venezuela. Venezuelans used to come to buy TVs, computers and other expensive goods. But with the Venezuelan economy in ruins, they now come to buy basic items like rice and sugar. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

Venezuelans Used To Cross Borders For Luxuries; Now It's For Toilet Paper

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The skin of the golden poison dart frog, Phyllobates terribilis, secretes a deadly poison that might lead to a better understanding of how to treat malfunctions of the human nervous system. Tambako the Jaguar/Getty Images hide caption

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Tambako the Jaguar/Getty Images

Chemists Re-Create Deadly Frog Poison In The Lab

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Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos makes a peace sign with wife Maria Clemencia Rodriguez after voting in the October referendum. That deal was rejected by voters; both sides hope the new, amended version will find success. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

FARC rebels met at a conference in September to endorse a peace deal with the Colombian government. A subsequent rejection of the deal by voters has left them in limbo. Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

Peace May Be On Hold, But Colombia's Rebels Are Eager To Become Civilians

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FARC members celebrate the announcement of the approval of the peace deal with the government during the closing ceremony of the 10th National Guerrilla Conference in Llanos del Yari last month. There are some 6,000 FARC guerrillas in Colombian camps. They can't start demobilizing until they are granted amnesty, but lawmakers can't act until a new peace agreement emerges. Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

After Voters Reject Colombia Peace Deal, Guerrillas Are Left In Limbo

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Juan Manuel Santos, the president of Colombia, listens to a panel discussion during the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative's Annual Meeting in New York City on Sept. 28, 2015. JP Yim/Getty Images hide caption

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Presidential guard soldiers keep watch during the referendum on a peace accord to end the five-decade-long guerrilla war between the FARC and the state on Sunday in Bogota, Colombia. Colombian voters rejected the peace deal in a very close vote. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A boy celebrates after finding out the results of the referendum on the peace accord. Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

In Surprise Result, Colombian Voters Reject Peace Deal

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Colombians in the capital, Bogota, hold up the letters for "peace" in Spanish in September. That agreement between the Colombian government and FARC rebels was rejected by voters in an October referendum. An amended agreement was signed Thursday and is expected to be approved. If implemented, it would end 60 years of nonstop conflict in Latin America. Jennifer Alarcon/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Alarcon/AP

U.S. envoy Bernard Aronson speaks at the State Department in Washingon on Feb. 20, 2015. Secretary of State John Kerry said Aronson announced that Aronson would be the special envoy to Colombia, where he helped negotiate an end to that country's 52-year war. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

The American Diplomat Who Helped Bring An End To Colombia's War

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Sebastian Marroquin, son of Colombia's late drug lord Pablo Escobar, spends much of his time barnstorming across Latin America as a motivational speaker, denouncing the illegal drug trade and his father's ultra-violent ways. "I feel I have a moral responsibility to go before society, recognize my father's crimes and to apologize to the victims of these crimes," Marroquín tells NPR. Eduardo Di Baia/AP images hide caption

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Eduardo Di Baia/AP images

Renouncing Pablo Escobar's Sins, His Son Trafficks In Motivational Talks

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A mural in the town of Toribio, Colombia, displays an idyllic rural scene. But the reality is that many rural parts of the country are desperately poor and lawless. Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images