Colombia Colombia

FARC guerrillas at a Colombia jungle camp last fall. Under last year's peace treaty, FARC agreed to disarm and confine its fighters to demobilization camps. But a small number of dissident rebels continue to extort business owners. Luis Acosta/AP hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AP

Dissident Rebels In Colombia Ignore Peace Treaty And Continue Extortion

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Luiz Otávio of Brazil's Chapecoense (left) celebrates with teammate Wellington Paulista after scoring against Colombia's Atlético Nacional in April. Chapecoense has a chance at another title — that of the Recopa Sudamericana — when it plays Atlético again in the second leg of the final this week. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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Andre Penner/AP

FARC rebel Alfredo Gutierrez holds his month-old daughter, Desiree, as fellow FARC rebel Jenny Cabrales plays with her. Since the Colombian government and FARC leaders reached an agreement last year to end the war, rebel women have given birth to more than 60 babies. About 80 more are pregnant. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

After Peace Agreement, A Baby Boom Among Colombia's FARC Guerrillas

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Soldiers carry a victim on a stretcher in Mocoa, Colombia, on Saturday, after an avalanche of mud and water from an overflowing river swept through the city as people slept. The incident triggered by intense rains left at least 125 people dead. Colombian National Army via AP hide caption

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Colombian National Army via AP

Sisters Bela Henriquez, left, and Nadiezhda Henriquez with their mother, Zulma Chacin de Henriquez, center, testified about how Giraldo Serna's drug operations destroyed their family. Marian Carrasquero/NPR hide caption

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Marian Carrasquero/NPR

Colombian actor Andres Parra (left) plays Hugo Chavez in the new telenovela, El Comandante. Manuel Rodriguez/Sony Pictures hide caption

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Manuel Rodriguez/Sony Pictures

For Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, A Second Life On The Small Screen

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The Colombian Congress endorsed the new peace agreement signed between the government and the Marxist rebel group known as the FARC. Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images

Brazil's Chapecoense players pose for pictures during their 2016 Copa Sudamericana semifinal against Argentina's San Lorenzo in Chapeco, Brazil, on Nov. 23. Most of the players on the team died in a plane crash in Colombia late Monday. Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

People wait at the border in Maicao, Colombia, just across from Venezuela. Venezuelans used to come to buy TVs, computers and other expensive goods. But with the Venezuelan economy in ruins, they now come to buy basic items like rice and sugar. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

Venezuelans Used To Cross Borders For Luxuries; Now It's For Toilet Paper

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