General Motors says it has halted operations in Venezuela after authorities seized a factory. The plant was confiscated Wednesday in what GM called an illegal judicial seizure of its assets. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

A demonstrator against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's government wears a mask calling for civil disobedience during a protest in Caracas on Wednesday. Ronaldo Schenidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A protester stares down riot police behind his gas mask, during demonstrations against Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas on Thursday. Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Pablo Guanipa is running for governor of the western Venezuelan state of Zulia, and as he campaigns in Maracaibo, the state capital, people complain of food shortages and hyperinflation. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

Opposition Parties In Venezuela Prepare For Elections, Hoping They Will Come

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A bakery worker grabs a bags of bread in Caracas, Venezuela, last month. Venezuelan bakeries are the latest industry to find themselves in the cross-hairs of President Nicolas Maduros administration, as bread lines grow in the capital Caracas. The government has ordered bakers to use scarce supplies of flour to produce price-controlled loaves. Wil Riera/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Wil Riera/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Venezuela's Bread Wars: With Food Scarce, Government Accuses Bakers Of Hoarding

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Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro has been under criticism following a Supreme Court decision nullifying the country's opposition-run legislature. The court reversed that decision Saturday. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Venezuelan National Assembly President Julio Borges rips up a Supreme Court ruling allowing magistrates to take over congressional duties, during a news conference at the National Assembly in Caracas on Thursday. Ariana Cubillos/AP hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP

Laurie Holt holds a photograph of her son Joshua Holt, who has been jailed in Venezuela, at her home in Riverton, Utah, in July 2016. "Eventually," she says, "he'll come home and we'll be able to go back to our normal lives. And I can stop crying every night." Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

For Utah Newlywed, An 'Egregious' Prison Stint In Venezuela

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Tarek El Aissami, then Venezuela's interior minister, holds a press conference in Caracas in April 2012. El Aissami became the country's vice president last month, and the U.S. Treasury Department announced sanctions against him on Monday. Leo Ramirez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Colombian actor Andres Parra (left) plays Hugo Chavez in the new telenovela, El Comandante. Manuel Rodriguez/Sony Pictures hide caption

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Manuel Rodriguez/Sony Pictures

For Venezuela's Hugo Chavez, A Second Life On The Small Screen

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A Venezuelan soldier watches over cargo trucks leaving the port in Puerto Cabello, which handles the majority of the country's food imports. Across the chain of command, from high-level generals to the lowest foot soldiers, military officials are using their growing power over the food supply to siphon off wealth for themselves. Ricardo Nunes/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Nunes/AP

As Venezuelans Go Hungry, The Military Is Trafficking In Food

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A man shows 100-Bolivar notes while crossing the Francisco de Paula Santander international bridge, linking Urena, in Venezuela and Cucuta, in Colombia Saturday, despite the border closing order issued by the Venezuelan government. George Castellanos/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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People wait at the border in Maicao, Colombia, just across from Venezuela. Venezuelans used to come to buy TVs, computers and other expensive goods. But with the Venezuelan economy in ruins, they now come to buy basic items like rice and sugar. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

Venezuelans Used To Cross Borders For Luxuries; Now It's For Toilet Paper

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Lilian Tintori, wife of prominent jailed opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez, waves a Venezuelan flag during a rally against the government of President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas on Wednesday. Ronaldo Schemidt /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt /AFP/Getty Images