Colombians celebrate in Bogota on Wednesday as they watch on a giant screen broadcasting the signing of a peace agreement between the Colombian Government and the FARC in Havana. Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebels of the 48th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia walk on a makeshift footbridge in the southern jungles of Putumayo on Aug. 12. On Wednesday, it was announced that the FARC and the Colombian government had reached a deal to end their decades-long conflict. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (left) and FARC commander Timoleon Jimenez (right) shake hands as Raul Castro looks on at a signing ceremony of a cease-fire deal in Havana last Thursday. "It is the first time ever that a guerrilla group lays down its arms to submit to a justice system where they are going to be investigated, judged, and condemned and sanctioned," Santos told NPR. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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Colombia's President: Making Peace With Rebels Is 'A Good Investment'

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A wreath placed before the statue of Simón Bolívar in Bogota's main square celebrates the peace accord between the Colombian government and the FARC leftist guerrilla group. The ribbon on the wreath says "Farewell to War" in Spanish; the sign beneath reads "R.I.P. War in Colombia." Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cuba's President Raul Castro (center) encourages Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos (left) and the commander of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia or FARC, known as Timochenko, to shake hands, in Havana, Cuba, Wednesday. Desmond Boylan/AP hide caption

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A man carries a bag with coca leaves in December 2013 in a rural area of Corinto, department of Cauca, Colombia. The Colombian government and the FARC are attempting address the issue of "illicit cultivation" as the third point of their ongoing peace talks. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Isabel Narvaez, in El Placer, says she is still traumatized by the rape she suffered. The small hamlet in Colombia is just one place where women were victims of violent crimes during the civil conflict. Paul Smith for NPR hide caption

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In Colombia, A Town Badly Scarred By Wartime Rape

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