FARC FARC

FARC guerrillas at a Colombia jungle camp last fall. Under last year's peace treaty, FARC agreed to disarm and confine its fighters to demobilization camps. But a small number of dissident rebels continue to extort business owners. Luis Acosta/AP hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AP

Dissident Rebels In Colombia Ignore Peace Treaty And Continue Extortion

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FARC rebel Alfredo Gutierrez holds his month-old daughter, Desiree, as fellow FARC rebel Jenny Cabrales plays with her. Since the Colombian government and FARC leaders reached an agreement last year to end the war, rebel women have given birth to more than 60 babies. About 80 more are pregnant. John Otis for NPR hide caption

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John Otis for NPR

After Peace Agreement, A Baby Boom Among Colombia's FARC Guerrillas

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The Colombian Congress endorsed the new peace agreement signed between the government and the Marxist rebel group known as the FARC. Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos makes a peace sign with wife Maria Clemencia Rodriguez after voting in the October referendum. That deal was rejected by voters; both sides hope the new, amended version will find success. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

FARC rebels met at a conference in September to endorse a peace deal with the Colombian government. A subsequent rejection of the deal by voters has left them in limbo. Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

Peace May Be On Hold, But Colombia's Rebels Are Eager To Become Civilians

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FARC members celebrate the announcement of the approval of the peace deal with the government during the closing ceremony of the 10th National Guerrilla Conference in Llanos del Yari last month. There are some 6,000 FARC guerrillas in Colombian camps. They can't start demobilizing until they are granted amnesty, but lawmakers can't act until a new peace agreement emerges. Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

After Voters Reject Colombia Peace Deal, Guerrillas Are Left In Limbo

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Presidential guard soldiers keep watch during the referendum on a peace accord to end the five-decade-long guerrilla war between the FARC and the state on Sunday in Bogota, Colombia. Colombian voters rejected the peace deal in a very close vote. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A boy celebrates after finding out the results of the referendum on the peace accord. Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images

In Surprise Result, Colombian Voters Reject Peace Deal

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U.S. envoy Bernard Aronson speaks at the State Department in Washingon on Feb. 20, 2015. Secretary of State John Kerry said Aronson announced that Aronson would be the special envoy to Colombia, where he helped negotiate an end to that country's 52-year war. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

The American Diplomat Who Helped Bring An End To Colombia's War

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A mural in the town of Toribio, Colombia, displays an idyllic rural scene. But the reality is that many rural parts of the country are desperately poor and lawless. Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images

Colombians celebrate in Bogota on Wednesday as they watch on a giant screen broadcasting the signing of a peace agreement between the Colombian Government and the FARC in Havana. Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Legaria/AFP/Getty Images

Rebels of the 48th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia walk on a makeshift footbridge in the southern jungles of Putumayo on Aug. 12. On Wednesday, it was announced that the FARC and the Colombian government had reached a deal to end their decades-long conflict. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP