Iris Galvez, a health insurance navigator (right) helps Mary Soliz of Houston, Texas, sign up for her first health plan through the Affordable Care Act on January 28, 2015 at a Houston community center. Courtesy of Iris Galvez hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Iris Galvez

Feds Hopeful Hispanics Will Respond As Open Enrollment Comes To A Close

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/464826389/464995822" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

America Ferrera stars in the new NBC comedy Superstore. Trae Patton//NBC hide caption

toggle caption Trae Patton//NBC

With 'Superstore,' America Ferrera Aims To 'Move The Dial' On Representation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/462384012/462590138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a town hall meeting at Keota High School, Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2015, in Keota, Iowa. Clinton has come under fire for her latest attempt at Latino outreach. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

toggle caption Charlie Neibergall/AP

#MemeOfTheWeek: Hillary Clinton, Not Quite An Abuela

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/461116160/461130962" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A swing set is all that remains in the backyard of a house in Middletown, Calif., after a devastating wildfire. Birth certificates and marriage licenses were among the important things destroyed. Lesley McClurg/Capital Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption Lesley McClurg/Capital Public Radio

Proof Of Citizenship Up In Flames After California Wildfires

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/453148830/454692368" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A still image from Guillermo del Toro's new movie, Crimson Peak. Twenty-two percent of audiences on any given weekend are Latino. But when it comes to horror films, that proportion jumps to as much as half the box office. Universal Pictures hide caption

toggle caption Universal Pictures

Why Latinos Heart Horror Films

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/452298992/453509967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Donald Trump speaks to the media at the U.S.-Mexico border in July. The Libre Initiative's letter doesn't call out any candidates by name, but Trump has called for mass deportation and an end to birthright citizenship for immigrants. LM Otero/AP hide caption

toggle caption LM Otero/AP

Donald Trump arrives at the National Federation of Republican Assemblies on Saturday in Nashville, Tenn., ahead of his speech before the conservative group. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

toggle caption Mark Humphrey/AP

The 'Trump Effect' Alienating Conservative Latinos

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/435584004/436229392" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

All the talk about immigration in the U.S. presidential campaign has renewed focus on the linguistic question of how to refer to people from Latin America. Here, the flags of Latin American and Caribbean states fly at a regional summit in San Jose, Costa Rica, in January. Arnoldo Robert/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Arnoldo Robert/LatinContent/Getty Images

Louis Arevalo holds his Truvada pills at his home in Los Angeles. The drug can be over 90 percent effective at preventing spread of HIV. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Soprano Catalina Cuervo, singing the role of Frida Kahlo, rehearses with bass baritone Ricardo Herrera, singing the role of Diego Rivera, on Feb. 21, 2015 at the Michigan Opera Theatre in Detroit. Veronica Zaragovia/KUT hide caption

toggle caption Veronica Zaragovia/KUT

Detroit's 'Frida' Aims To Build Latino Audiences For Opera

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/394438326/394438329" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Los Angeles Lakers sport "Los Lakers" jerseys each March, for "Noche Latina" games. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Lakers May Be Losing Games, But They're Still Winning Latino Fans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/364509133/364562048" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lauren Farnsworth (left) and April Buell hand out literature in late March encouraging people to get health coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

toggle caption Brennan Linsley/AP

Yolanda Madrid of Miami (left) talks with navigator Daniela Campos while signing up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act in January. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

toggle caption Lynne Sladky/AP

Florida's Insurers Push To Sell Health Coverage To Latinos

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/286647459/286710884" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Selling Health Care To California's Latinos Got Lost In Translation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/286226698/286646577" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mynor Sanchez, a resident of Moore, Okla., lives a few blocks away and three houses down from major destruction. He is volunteering Friday in the neighborhood with his church, Templo El Alabanza, trying to do any tasks with which residents need help. Katie Hayes Luke for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

'Part Of The Community': Latinos Rebuild After Okla. Tornado

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/186704626/186712130" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript