Hillary Clinton is running with all the advantages and challenges of someone who has been in the public eye for more than two decades. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Hillary Clinton has described herself as the most famous person you don't really know. And as she launches into her second presidential campaign, she'll be reintroducing herself to voters who largely think they have her figured out. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Hillary Clinton in June 1969 at the Rodham family home. She was featured in a Life magazine story called "The Class of '69." Lee Balterman/The LIFE Premium Collection/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Lee Balterman/The LIFE Premium Collection/Getty Images

Sen. Elizabeth Warren talked about 2016 to WBUR's Here & Now: "What I care about is that everyone who runs for president, who runs for any national office right now, talks about this core set of issues." Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Sen. Charles Schumer of New York stands a podium March 3 as Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada looks on. Reid is backing Schumer to be his replacement as Democratic leader. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

itoggle caption J. Scott Applewhite/AP

NPR knocked on doors throughout Colorado to find out how individual voters were responding to Democratic and Republican appeals in the lead up to Election Day. Molly Messick/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Molly Messick/NPR

Democrat Charlie Crist, a former Republican governor of Florida (left), and Rick Scott, the current Republican governor of Florida, listen to the moderators during a gubernatorial debate on Friday. The two are facing off in a tight race that's fueling a barrage of negative campaign ads. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Lynne Sladky/AP

A sign directs voters at a polling site in Atlanta. "Georgia is changing dramatically," Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jason Carter says. "There's no doubt that Georgia is next in line as a national battleground state." David Goldman/AP hide caption

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Republican officials Rob Collins, Phil Cox and Matt Walter all seemed pleased at a briefing for journalists about the GOP's midterm election prospects, as did former first lady Mamie Eisenhower. Frank James/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Frank James/NPR

Some voters are a lot more complicated than is commonly understood, a new Pew Research Center study suggests. In Denver, an election worker collects a mail-in ballot from a voter on Tuesday. Ed Andrieski/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Ed Andrieski/AP