Alice Furlaud in Gstaad, Switzerland, with a Krugerrand gold piece. Courtesy of Alice Furlaud/Courtesy of Alice Furlaud hide caption

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Courtesy of Alice Furlaud/Courtesy of Alice Furlaud

Remembering NPR Essayist Alice Furlaud

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Marion Chabrel (center), 37, has taken in two migrants as roommates, Brahim (left), from Bangladesh, and Shabada (right) from Afghanistan. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

For Newly Arrived Migrants, Paris Offers An Upgraded Welcome

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Kim Kardashian West speaks at The Girls' Lounge dinner, giving visibility to women at Advertising Week 2016, on Sept. 27 at Pier 60 in New York City. Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for The Girls' Loun hide caption

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Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for The Girls' Loun

French designer Sonia Rykiel (right) and her daughter, Nathalie Rykiel, artistic director for the fashion house Rykiel, greet the crowd after the presentation of their Spring-Summer 2008 Ready-to-Wear collection, in Paris in 2007. Jacques Brinon/AP hide caption

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Jacques Guillaume, 73, has been repairing electric razors in Paris since 1962. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

The Last Razor Repairman In Paris

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Torrential downpours have lashed parts of Europe in recent days. In Paris, the Seine River breached its banks in places. Geoffrey Van Der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Geoffrey Van Der Hasselt/AFP/Getty Images

A fire truck is parked at the entrance to Monceau parc in the center of Paris, France, on Saturday, after a lightning bolt crashed down onto a Paris park, striking 11 people at a child's birthday party. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP

The Le Bourdon family and friends spend the evening in the Paris park of Buttes Chaumont. The city plans to leave many of its parks, including the largest ones, open all night this summer, a move supported by Parisians. Eleanor Beardsley / NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley / NPR

Paris Extends Summer Nights By Keeping Parks Open After Sunset

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A police officer guards the entrance of the judicial police headquarters in Paris. The French prosecutor's office said Salah Abdeslam, the key suspect in the Paris attacks, was transferred from Belgium to France on Wednesday morning. Michel Euler/AP hide caption

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Belgian police officers stand in Albert I square in Brussels, where authorities arrested Mohamed Abrini, a key Paris attacks suspect, on Friday. Thierry Charlier /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Belgian Federal Police released surveillance video of three men suspected of taking part in the attacks at Belgium's Zaventem Airport, including the "man in the hat." AP hide caption

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Law enforcement descended on Argenteuil, northwest of Paris, where a suspect allegedly was planning a major terrorist attack on France. He was arrested Thursday. GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kiss Me, Kate is the latest in a series of American musicals to be performed at the Theatre du Chatelet in Paris. "It is such a glorious theater to perform in," says director Lee Blakeley. Vincent Pontent/Courtesy of Théâtre du Châtelet hide caption

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Vincent Pontent/Courtesy of Théâtre du Châtelet

The Bataclan concert hall in Paris was the scene of carnage during November's terrorist attack. The lifesaving actions that night by Didi, a security guard of North African descent, have only recently become known. Survivors say he may have helped save 400 to 500 people. Francois Guillot /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Guillot /AFP/Getty Images

In France, A Quiet Hero Belatedly Comes To Light

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Activists hold a banner reading "standing and decided for climate" during a demonstration near the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Dec. 12, 2015, during the United Nations Climate Change Conference. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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A makeshift memorial at Place de la Republique in Paris, shown on December 24, is one of many sites where mourners have left tributes to the victims of the November 13 terror attacks. A coordinated series of gun and bomb attacks at several sites in Paris on November 13 left 130 dead. Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images

Paris Preserves Impromptu Memorials To Victims Of Attack

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French Foreign Minister and President of the COP21 Laurent Fabius (center) gives a thumbs up while U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) and French President Francois Hollande applaud after the final meeting of the U.N. conference on climate change in Le Bourget, France, on Saturday. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Climate scientists who scrutinized the U.N. accord are urging citizens to keep a sharp eye on each nation's leaders to make sure they follow through on pledges to reduce emissions. Simone Golob/Corbis hide caption

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Simone Golob/Corbis

Scientists See U.N. Climate Accord As A Good Start, But Just A Start

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French President Francois Hollande, right, French Foreign Minister and president of the COP21 meetings Laurent Fabius, second right, UN climate chief Christiana Figueres, left, and UN Secretary-General Ban ki-Moon join hands after the final adoption of an agreement at the COP21 United Nations conference on climate change. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP