The Le Bourdon family and friends spend the evening in the Paris park of Buttes Chaumont. The city plans to leave many of its parks, including the largest ones, open all night this summer, a move supported by Parisians. Eleanor Beardsley / NPR hide caption

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Paris Extends Summer Nights By Keeping Parks Open After Sunset

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A police officer guards the entrance of the judicial police headquarters in Paris. The French prosecutor's office said Salah Abdeslam, the key suspect in the Paris attacks, was transferred from Belgium to France on Wednesday morning. Michel Euler/AP hide caption

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Belgian police officers stand in Albert I square in Brussels, where authorities arrested Mohamed Abrini, a key Paris attacks suspect, on Friday. Thierry Charlier /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Belgian Federal Police released surveillance video of three men suspected of taking part in the attacks at Belgium's Zaventem Airport, including the "man in the hat." AP hide caption

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Law enforcement descended on Argenteuil, northwest of Paris, where a suspect allegedly was planning a major terrorist attack on France. He was arrested Thursday. GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kiss Me, Kate is the latest in a series of American musicals to be performed at the Theatre du Chatelet in Paris. "It is such a glorious theater to perform in," says director Lee Blakeley. Vincent Pontent/Courtesy of Théâtre du Châtelet hide caption

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The Bataclan concert hall in Paris was the scene of carnage during November's terrorist attack. The lifesaving actions that night by Didi, a security guard of North African descent, have only recently become known. Survivors say he may have helped save 400 to 500 people. Francois Guillot /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In France, A Quiet Hero Belatedly Comes To Light

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Activists hold a banner reading "standing and decided for climate" during a demonstration near the Eiffel Tower in Paris on Dec. 12, 2015, during the United Nations Climate Change Conference. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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A makeshift memorial at Place de la Republique in Paris, shown on December 24, is one of many sites where mourners have left tributes to the victims of the November 13 terror attacks. A coordinated series of gun and bomb attacks at several sites in Paris on November 13 left 130 dead. Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paris Preserves Impromptu Memorials To Victims Of Attack

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French Foreign Minister and President of the COP21 Laurent Fabius (center) gives a thumbs up while U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) and French President Francois Hollande applaud after the final meeting of the U.N. conference on climate change in Le Bourget, France, on Saturday. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Climate scientists who scrutinized the U.N. accord are urging citizens to keep a sharp eye on each nation's leaders to make sure they follow through on pledges to reduce emissions. Simone Golob/Corbis hide caption

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Scientists See U.N. Climate Accord As A Good Start, But Just A Start

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French President Francois Hollande, right, French Foreign Minister and president of the COP21 meetings Laurent Fabius, second right, UN climate chief Christiana Figueres, left, and UN Secretary-General Ban ki-Moon join hands after the final adoption of an agreement at the COP21 United Nations conference on climate change. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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President Obama and French President Francois Hollande place flowers at the Bataclan, site of one of the Paris terrorists attacks. Obama is in Paris for a climate-change conference. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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A power-generating windmill turbine is seen in front of the Arc de Triomphe on the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris ahead of the COP21 World Climate Summit, which begins Monday. Christian Hartmann/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Delegates from about 170 countries gathered in Kyoto in December 1997 during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. This year in Paris, the stakes are even higher, negotiators say. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kyoto Treaty Fizzled, But Climate Talkers Insist Paris Is Different

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A demonstrator kicks a tear gas canister during clashes with riot police near the Place de la République after the cancellation of a planned climate march. Eric Gaillard /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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French President Francois Hollande delivers a speech honoring victims of the Paris attacks during a ceremony at the Invalides in Paris on Friday. The names of each of the 130 people killed in the attacks two weeks ago was read aloud. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Joel Touitou Laloux's family owned Paris' Bataclan theater from 1976 until last year, when the performance hall was sold and he retired to Israel. He's shown here on Nov. 18 at his home in the Mediterranean coastal city of Ashdod in southern Israel. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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From Retirement In Israel, Bataclan Ex-Owner Recalls Better Times

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Paris Prosecutor Francois Molins delivers a press conference Tuesday about the Nov. 13 attacks that claimed 130 lives in the French capital. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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