Iraqi anti-terrorism forces patrol in central Ramadi, Iraq, on April 18. A month later, the city fell to the self-declared Iraqi State. Ayman Oghanna, a journalist who was embedded with Iraqi Special Forces in the city, says the Special Forces are capable precision fighters — but are being asked to fill the role of an entire military. AP hide caption

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AP

Thousands Who Run, Few Who Fight: A Journalist On Ramadi's Fall

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Defense Secretary Ash Carter testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington earlier this month. In an interview on CNN Sunday, Carter complained that Iraqi forces lacked "the will to fight" the self-declared Islamic State. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

President Obama tells The Atlantic that the loss of Ramadi to the self-declared Islamic State is a "setback," but he denies the U.S. is losing to the group. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP