Barbara Mancini with her father, Joseph Yourshaw. Barbara Mancini via Compassion & Choices hide caption

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A snippet of the data ProPublica obtained from the federal government about Medicare Part D, the prescription drug benefit for seniors. ProPublica hide caption

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Study participants were trained in practical reasoning skills like managing medications. Jorge Salcedo/iStockphoto hide caption

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Could a countdown to death help you lead a more ecstatic life? Daniel Horowitz for NPR hide caption

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Nothing Focuses The Mind Like The Ultimate Deadline: Death

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What seemed like a burden can become a gift. iStockphoto hide caption

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Spiffing up the garden may also make your cardiovascular risk profile look better, too. Lauren Mitchell/Flickr hide caption

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President Obama and House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio talk with reporters at the White House after a meeting about the federal budget deficit and economy in Nov. 2012. Some Republicans have proposed raising the Medicare eligibility age to 67. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Some patients at MultiCare Auburn Medical Center in Washington are given wristbands showing that they have a high risk of falling. John Ryan/KUOW hide caption

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To Reduce Patient Falls, Hospitals Try Alarms, More Nurses

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Taking care of a family member can be a life-extending experience, a study finds. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Playing this game won't make you feel older, unless you're already getting up there in age. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Gaining a few more years of healthy life would be great for individuals, but expensive for Medicare, researchers say. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Delaying Aging May Have A Bigger Payoff Than Fighting Disease

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