Michael Pagliaro, left, laughs with Paul Scattaretico at the Muzic Store Inc. in Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., as Pagliaro picks up instruments for his rental business. Before Pagliaro had a hip replacement, pain made it difficult to work. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Depression is common among old people, affecting up to 25 percent. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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The number of eyelid lifts reimbursed by Medicare more than tripled from 2001 to 2011, according to the Center for Public Integrity. Here, a woman is prepared for the procedure, along with an eyebrow lift. Media for Medical/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Group houses are becoming popular — again — among some single baby boomers, and not just for financial reasons. Marianne Kilkenny (second from right) shares her home in Asheville, N.C, with four other people. Mike Belleme/The New York Times hide caption

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Confusion over the details of the new health care law is leaving many people vulnerable to con artists. Evelyne Lois Such, 86, was recently the target of an attempted scam. Matt Nager for NPR hide caption

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Lou Ann Schachner, 84, and Jay Schachner, 81, are volunteers with the Northwestern University SuperAging Project. They keep track of all their plans in a shared calendar. She loves to cook and study French and he is a part-time tax lawyer. Samantha Murphy for NPR hide caption

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An older man performs exercises in Mumbai, India. Research suggests that moderate physical exercise may be the best way to keep our brains healthy as we age. Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP hide caption

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Seniors in the Southeast were much more likely to be prescribed more than one high-risk medications in 2009. Danya Qato and Amal Trivedi/Alpert Medical School, Brown University hide caption

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People who are socially isolated may be at a greater risk of dying sooner, a British study suggests. But do Facebook friends count? How about texting? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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A towel covers the face of a man in a geriatric day care facility of the German Red Cross at Villa Albrecht in Berlin. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Social worker Nuria Casulleres shows a portrait of Audrey Hepburn to elderly men during a memory activity at the Cuidem La Memoria elderly home in Barcelona, Spain, last August. The home specializes in Alzheimer's patients. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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