Women may have different ways of coping with childhood stresses than men, which may increase their risk of health problems in adulthood. Jutta Klee/Uppercut/Getty Images hide caption

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Queen Silvia of Sweden attends the World Childhood Foundation 16th anniversary gala Thursday in New York City. Theo Wargo/Getty Images for World Childhood hide caption

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The Penn State University campus in State College, Pa. A new state law requires university professors to get a background check every three years and have their fingerprints taken. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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After Sandusky, A Debate Over Whether Sex-Abuse Law Goes Too Far

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Alachua County Sheriff Sadie Darnell (left) and Dr. Nancy Hardt, University of Florida. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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A Sheriff And A Doctor Team Up To Map Childhood Trauma

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Silvester Fullard fixes dinner for his 11-year-old son Tavestsiar. When Tavestsiar first came to live with his dad in 2010, he was closed off, Silvester says; "he didn't want to be around other kids." Charles Mostoller for NPR hide caption

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To Head Off Trauma's Legacy, Start Young

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10 Questions Some Doctors Are Afraid To Ask

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Can Family Secrets Make You Sick?

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Child Abuse And Neglect Laws Aren't Being Enforced, Report Finds

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Using Tor, or The Onion Router, enables users to hide their online activities. Advocates say the network protects the privacy of activists. But prosecutors say it's used extensively by criminals — and is making it harder for law enforcement to do its job. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Prosecutors Say Tools For Hiding Online Hinder Cybercrime Crackdowns

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Girls are particularly vulnerable to brain changes caused by stress or trauma, researchers say. Allen Johnson/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Childhood Maltreatment Can Leave Scars In The Brain

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