A woman is carried away in a stretcher by medics Thursday after being trapped for six days in the rubble of a collapsed building, in the Huruma area of Nairobi, Kenya. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ben Curtis/AP

Students from the Sekenani Girls Secondary School gather outside their dormitory after lunch. The new school is the first high school for girls in the Maasai region. Harriet Constable for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Harriet Constable for NPR

A Kenya Wildlife Services ranger stands guard in front illegal stockpiles of burning elephant tusks at the Nairobi National Park on April 30, 2016. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images

Up In Flames: Kenya Burns More Than 100 Tons Of Ivory

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476031765/476272580" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ayub Mohamed is a nominee for the Global Teacher Prize, worth $1 million, given out by the Varkey Foundation. YouTube hide caption

toggle caption YouTube

Lesson Plan: Teach Students How To Rebuff Terrorist Recruiters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469929149/470040323" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Netflix iStockPhoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockPhoto

Is Netflix Chill? Kenyan Authorities Threaten To Ban The Streaming Site

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463807063/463865439" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Somalis living in the Dadaab camp in Kenya gather to watch the arrival of the United Nations high commissioner for refugees last May. Tony Karumba /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Tony Karumba /AFP/Getty Images

The World's Largest Refugee Camp Looks Like A Slum/Star Wars Mashup

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/462698276/462698277" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mohamud Saleh, shown here during a recent interview, built his reputation by greatly reducing crime in a lawless part of northeastern Kenya in the 1990s. After an absence of more than a decade, he's returned to battle terrorism, and argues that the same tactics will work this time as well. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Gregory Warner/NPR

Kenyan Lawman Vows To Defeat Terrorism The Way He Fought Crime

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/442814028/446370944" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The rapper V-Sita (at right) had a No. 1 hit in Kenya with the song "Hivo Ndio Kunaendaga." YouTube hide caption

toggle caption YouTube

Stop The Foreign Music! African Pop Stars Ask For Government Help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/432211951/432762443" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript