A female sanitation worker wears standard gear for a Doctors Without Borders Ebola center. The outfit includes rubber boots, goggles, a face mask, a hood, three layers of gloves, a Tyvek suit and thick rubber apron. No exposed skin is allowed. She was photographed in Monrovia, Liberia. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

toggle caption John W. Poole/NPR
Gear Wars: Whose Ebola Protective Suit Is Better?
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/358898029/358898030" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Patrick Kamara adjusts his googles on the final day of training and the first "dress rehearsal" before being sent out to Ebola treatment units. The World Health Organization is ramping up to train up to 500 new health workers a week as part of the effort to stem the spread of Ebola. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

toggle caption John W. Poole/NPR
On Front Lines Against Ebola, Training A Matter Of Life Or Death
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/355671751/355769308" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A World Health Organization worker trains nurses how to use Ebola protective gear in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Michael Duff/AP hide caption

toggle caption Michael Duff/AP
Dire Predictions On Ebola's Spread From Top Health Organizations
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/350937467/350946988" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man lies in a newly opened Ebola isolation center in a closed school in Monrovia, Liberia, on Thursday. The official death toll of 1,000 people in four countries is likely below the actual number, the World Health Organization says. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption John Moore/Getty Images

Miguel Pajares, a Spanish priest who was infected with the Ebola virus while working in Liberia, is transferred from a plane to an ambulance after arriving in Spain. He was treated with an experimental drug but died on the disease. Spanish Defense Ministry/AP hide caption

toggle caption Spanish Defense Ministry/AP

In 1995, amid an Ebola outbreak, Zairian Red Cross personnel picked up sick people and bodies left on the streets of Kikwit, 250 miles from the capital Kinshasa. Jean-Marc Bouju/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jean-Marc Bouju/AP
Why Treating Ebola With An Experimental Serum Might Help
  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/337188425/337843000" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

AIDS drugs line a pharmacy's shelves. A new recommendation from the World Health Organization suggests a daily anti-HIV pill for men who have sex with men. Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov hide caption

toggle caption Astrid Riecken/MCT/Landov

A nurse walks towards the Roger Salengro Hospital in Lille, France, where two patients were diagnosed with a coronavirus related to SARS. Michel Spingler/AP hide caption

toggle caption Michel Spingler/AP

A health worker injects a woman with a shot of Depo Provera, a quarterly contraceptive injection, at a health clinic in Busia, Uganda, in 2009. MCT/MCT via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption MCT/MCT via Getty Images