The United Nations humanitarian coordinator for Yemen, Jamie McGoldrick (center, in light blue shirt) inspects a funeral hall on Monday, two days after it was destroyed in Sanaa, Yemen, in an airstrike by a Saudi-led coalition. At least 140 people were killed. Hani Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Hani Mohammed/AP

As Yemen's War Worsens, Questions Grow About The U.S. Role

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Rebels in control of Yemen's capital accused the Saudi-led coalition of killing or wounding hundreds of people in air strikes that hit a large funeral hall in Sanaa Saturday. Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sens. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and John Cornyn, R-Texas, speak with Kaitlyn (left) and Terry Strada — whose husband, Thomas, died in the Sept. 11 attacks — after a May 17 news conference concerning the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act in Washington. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Congress Overrides Obama's Veto On Sept. 11 Lawsuit Bill

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Khalid al-Falih is shown at a conference in Riyadh in January, when he was still chairman of Saudi Arabia's state oil giant, Saudi Aramco. He became the country's oil minister in May. Saudi Arabia has been looking to diversify its holdings, and Aramco is reportedly looking to buy an oil refinery near the port of Houston. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

As Saudi Arabia Diversifies, A Texas Oil Refinery May Be In Its Future

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Yemenis inspect the damage in a room at a hospital operated by the Paris-based aid agency Doctors Without Borders in Abs, in the northern province of Hajjah, on Tuesday. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Solar-powered Solar Impulse 2 aircraft prepares to take off from the Cairo International Airport in the Egyptian capital on Sunday as it heads to Abu Dhabi on the final leg of its world tour. Khaled Desouki /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki /AFP/Getty Images

Former Florida Senator Bob Graham, shown here in 2011, co-chaired the congressional inquiry into possible Saudi government links to the Sept. 11 hijackers. He long advocated releasing the 2002 report, known as the "28 pages," which were made public on Friday. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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Saudi Prince Faisal bin Salman bin Abdulaziz (left) visits an injured policeman at a local hospital following a suicide attack near the security headquarters of the Prophet's Mosque in Medina on July 4. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Monday's Attack In Medina 'An Attack On The Soul Of The Muslim World'

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U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaks at the United Nations on Thursday. In a surprising admission, Ban said he came under pressure to remove Saudi Arabia from a list of countries that harm children. The Saudis had been placed on the list because of their bombing campaign in Yemen. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Saudi Arabia Dropped From List Of Those Harming Children; U.N. Cites Pressure

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Majd kept a journal about a time in her life when she was torn between getting married or going to school. Courtesy of Madj hide caption

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Courtesy of Madj

Diary Of A Saudi Girl: Karate Lover, Science Nerd ... Bride?

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President Obama and Saudi Arabia's King Salman meet in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on April 20. Salman, 80, has been far more assertive on foreign policy than many expected. The U.S. and Saudi Arabia have had differences on issues such as dealing with Iran and fighting the Islamic State. The king announced a restructuring of the government on Saturday. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

President Obama shakes hands with Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud following a meeting in November at the G20 summit in Antalya, Turkey. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Plenty Of Friction Expected During Obama's Visit To Saudi Arabia

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A motorcyclist waits Feb. 17 to buy gas in Caracas, Venezuela. President Nicolas Maduro increased the price of gasoline for the first time in 20 years, as he faced growing pressure to ease an economic crisis in the oil-producing country. Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Barreto/AFP/Getty Images

Cheap Oil Usually Means Global Growth, But This Time Seems Different

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Saudi artist Abdulnasser Gharem poses in front of "Generation Kill," a piece made with rubber stamps, digital print and paint, at the opening night of his exhibition titled Al Sahwa (The Awakening) at Ayyam gallery in Dubai in 2014. Aya Batrawy/AP hide caption

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Aya Batrawy/AP

A New Generation Of Saudi Artists Pushes The Boundaries

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Mohammed al-Nimr is the son Shiite Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, who was executed by Saudi Arabia. Courtesy of Mohammed al-Nimr hide caption

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Courtesy of Mohammed al-Nimr

Shiite Sheikh Executed By Saudi Arabia Preached Against Violence, Son Says

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Saudi Arabia's King Salman (left) speaks with his son Mohammed in the capital Riyadh in 2012. The king was the crown prince at the time. When he assumed the throne last year, Salman named Mohammed, now 30, the deputy crown prince and defense minister. They have pursued a much more aggressive foreign policy in the region, particularly when it comes to confronting Iran. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Family members of Shafqat Hussain, who was convicted and hanged in Pakistan in August for killing a boy in 2004, waited to receive his body outside the central jail in Karachi. Pakistan executed more than 300 people last year. Fareed Khan/AP hide caption

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Fareed Khan/AP

Fewer Countries Are Relying On Death Penalty, But They're Executing More

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An Iranian woman in Tehran holds up a poster showing Sheikh Nimr al-Nimr, a prominent opposition Saudi Shiite cleric who was executed in Saudi Arabia on Jan. 2. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Journalist Says Iran-Saudi Showdown Comes At A 'Really Dangerous' Time

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