Mary Mullens, age 93, in her room at Edgewood Summit Retirement Community in Charleston, W.Va. Mullens is a patient of Dr. Todd Goldberg, one of only 36 geriatricians in the state. Kara Lofton/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Few Young Doctors Are Training To Care For U.S. Elderly

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Virginia Anderlini (right) was the first private client to try out Dr. Sonya Kim's new virtual reality program for the elderly, and says she's eager to see more. Kim's handful of programs are still at the demo stage. Kara Platoni/KQED hide caption

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Doctors At Southern Hospitals Take The Most Payments From Drug, Device Companies

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A single modest meal for a doctor was associated with a higher likelihood he or she would prescribe Crestor, a cholesterol drug, instead of a generic. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Bernard Rosenfeld, 74, has not been able to find a successor to lead his abortion practice in Houston. He says younger doctors don't want to deal with the politics and protesters. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Politics Makes Abortion Training In Texas Difficult

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George Washington University is training doctors to understand the health care system as it also teaches them how to take care of patients. Team Static/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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For Doctors-In-Training, A Dose Of Health Policy Helps The Medicine Go Down

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Giselle is pursuing a career in family medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. For her, hiding her problems with anxiety and depression was not an option. Amanda Aronczyk/WNYC hide caption

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A Med Student Decides To Be Upfront About Her Mental Issues

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Pharmacists in California will have to give women a short health consultation before providing contraceptives without a prescription. Media for Medical/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Abraham Nussbaum argues for medicine to reconnect with its past: Caring for patients should be a calling, not a job, he says. PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images hide caption

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Diane Horvath-Cosper says part of her job is advocating for patients' access to health care, including abortions. Gabriella Demczuk hide caption

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Can A Hospital Tell A Doctor To Stop Talking About Abortion?

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Medical errors rank behind heart disease and cancer as the third leading cause of death in the U.S., Johns Hopkins researchers say. iStockphoto hide caption

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Hear Rachel Martin talk with Dr. Martin Makary

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Talking about end-of-life care may be difficult, but the stakes make the conversations worth the effort. Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

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The entrance to Sutter Davis Hospital in Davis, Calif. Sutter Health has hospitals in more than 100 communities in Northern California; it reported $11 billion in revenue last year, with an operating profit of $287 million. Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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A doctor walks through a hallway at the Centro Medico trauma center in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 2013. A medical exodus has been taking place for a decade in the Caribbean territory as doctors and nurses flee for the U.S. mainland, seeking higher salaries and better reimbursements from insurers. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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SOS: Puerto Rico Is Losing Doctors, Leaving Patients Stranded

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A federal whistleblower suit unsealed in late February alleges that Humana knew about billing fraud involving Medicare Advantage patients and didn't stop it. Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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