Amanda Angelotti (left) and Connie Chen, both graduates of University of California, San Francisco's medical school, opted for careers in digital health. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

itoggle caption Josh Cassidy/KQED

Nora Zamichow says if she and her husband, Mark Saylor, had known how doctors die, they might have made different treatment decisions for him toward the end of his life. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

itoggle caption Maya Sugarman/KPCC

University of Chicago medical student Manny Quaidoo adds a pinch of salt to the spinach feta frittata he's learning to cook as part of a culinary medicine class. Monica Eng/WBEZ hide caption

itoggle caption Monica Eng/WBEZ

Travis Driscoll, a medical school applicant from Berkeley, Calif., studies for the revamped MCAT. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

itoggle caption April Dembosky/KQED

Diagnosis by text or a phone call is often convenient and popular with patients. But is it good medicine? Apriori/iStockphoto hide caption

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UnitedHealthcare says it will cover doctors' visits by live video on smartphones, tablets and computers. Doctor On Demand hide caption

itoggle caption Doctor On Demand

Science-based guidelines say there's no benefit to getting an EKG of heart activity before routine cataract surgery — even if the patient is old. But most doctors order such tests anyway. Bull's Eye/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

itoggle caption Bull's Eye/ImageZoo/Corbis

Dr. Raj Mangrulkar and medical student Jesse Burk-Rafel at the University of Michigan Medical School. Good communication skills, teamwork and adaptability will help doctors thrive through swift changes in medical science, Mangrulkar says. Leisa Thompson/Courtesy of University of Michigan Medical School hide caption

itoggle caption Leisa Thompson/Courtesy of University of Michigan Medical School
Lorenzo Gritti for NPR