Talking about end-of-life care may be difficult, but the stakes make the conversations worth the effort. Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

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The entrance to Sutter Davis Hospital in Davis, Calif. Sutter Health has hospitals in more than 100 communities in Northern California; it reported $11 billion in revenue last year, with an operating profit of $287 million. Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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A doctor walks through a hallway at the Centro Medico trauma center in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 2013. A medical exodus has been taking place for a decade in the Caribbean territory as doctors and nurses flee for the U.S. mainland, seeking higher salaries and better reimbursements from insurers. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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SOS: Puerto Rico Is Losing Doctors, Leaving Patients Stranded
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A federal whistleblower suit unsealed in late February alleges that Humana knew about billing fraud involving Medicare Advantage patients and didn't stop it. Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Some doctors say clinicians can now get much more information from newer technology than they can get from a stethoscope. Clinging to the old tool isn't necessary, they say. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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The Stethoscope: Timeless Tool Or Outdated Relic?
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Criminologist Joseph Richardson is skeptical that the federal government alone can solve the data problem for police shootings. "There has to be a more pioneering, innovative approach to doing it," he says. Spotmatik/iStockphoto hide caption

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Study Suggests Surgical Residents Can Safely Work Longer Shifts
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After knee surgery, David Larson, 66, of Huntington Beach, Calif., experienced pain in a calf muscle. His answer to an automated email from the doctor led to the diagnosis and treatment of a potentially dangerous blood clot. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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