In a cluster of glowing human stem cells, one cell divides. The cell membrane is shown in purple, while DNA in the dividing nucleus is blue. The white fibers linking the nucleus are spindles, which aid in cell division. Allen Institute for Cell Science hide caption

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Allen Institute for Cell Science
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Researchers Question Safety, Value Of Untested Stem Cell Treatments

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In this file photo, a professor holds a tray of stem cells at the University of Connecticut. The NIH plans to lift a moratorium on funding studies using human stem cells in animal embryos. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The Chimera Quandary: Is It Ethical To Create Hybrid Embryos?

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Pablo Ross of the University of California, Davis, inserts human stem cells into a pig embryo as part of experiments to create chimeric embryos. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

NIH Plans To Lift Ban On Research Funds For Part-Human, Part-Animal Embryos

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Jeannie Phan for NPR

In Search For Cures, Scientists Create Embryos That Are Both Animal And Human

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Human stem cells, in this case made from adult skin cells, can give rise to any sort of human cell. Some scientists would like to insert such cells into nonhuman, animal embryos, in hopes of one day growing human organs for transplantation. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Should Human Stem Cells Be Used To Make Partly Human Chimeras?

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Image of a mini-kidney formed in a dish from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Minoru Takasato/Nature hide caption

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Minoru Takasato/Nature

Scientists Grow Primitive Human Kidneys In A Dish

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In 1954, Dr. Frederick C. Robbins, then chief of pediatrics and contagious diseases at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, was one of three winners of that year's Nobel Prize in medicine. The scientists' work, which led to a vaccine against polio, was performed in human fetal cells. AP hide caption

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AP

Research On Fetal Tissue Draws Renewed Political, Scientific Scrutiny

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Loki's Castle, the field of deep sea vents between Norway and Greenland, is home to sediments containing DNA from the newly discovered archaea. R.B. Pedersen/Centre for Geobiology, Bergen, Norway hide caption

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R.B. Pedersen/Centre for Geobiology, Bergen, Norway

Missing Link Microbes May Help Explain How Single Cells Became Us

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Isabella Beukes, of Santa Rosa, Calif., has been legally blind for more than 40 years. An experimental treatment derived from embryonic stem cells seems to have enabled her now to see not just color but also some shapes. Tim Hussin for NPR hide caption

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Tim Hussin for NPR

Embryonic Stem Cells Restore Vision In Preliminary Human Test

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The heart beats in a mouse embryo grown with stem cells made from blood. Now the research that claimed a simple acid solution could be used to create those cells has been retracted. Courtesy of Haruko Obokata hide caption

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Courtesy of Haruko Obokata

Easy Method For Making Stem Cells Was Too Good To Be True

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New research could be promising for infertile men. Scientists were able to make immature sperm cells from skin cells. Their next challenge is to make that sperm viable. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

'Provocative' Research Turns Skin Cells Into Sperm

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A cross-section of skeletal muscle in this light micrograph shows the individual, parallel muscle fibers (red). These fibers work in concert to power movement. Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/ScienceSource hide caption

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Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/ScienceSource

Experimental Technique Coaxes Muscles Destroyed By War To Regrow

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