American actress Angelina Jolie speaks at a conference for the prevention of sexual violence in conflict, at the Dom Armije in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, in 2014. Ismail Duru/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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When Erika Stallings was 22, she found out that she might have a genetic mutation that greatly increased her risk of cancer. Misha Friedman for NPR hide caption

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More People Seek Genetic Testing, But There Aren't Enough Counselors

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Actress and filmmaker Angelina Jolie Pitt says she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to lower her odds of getting cancer. Matt Sayles/Matt Sayles/Invision/AP hide caption

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Mary-Claire King says obscurity gave her the freedom to spend years looking for breast cancer genes. Mary Levin/University of Washington hide caption

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How Being Ignored Helped A Woman Discover The Breast Cancer Gene

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Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy after genetic testing has prompted a discussion about which other tests should be covered. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Regina and Gabriel Brett talk with Michel Martin about their cancer dilemma

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Peggy Orenstein talks with David Greene on Morning Edition

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In sharing her decision to have a double mastectomy, Angelina Jolie has given voice to a dilemma more women are facing. Carlo Allegri/AP hide caption

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Actress Angelina Jolie at a news conference with Secretary of State John Kerry (in background) and other foreign ministers in London last month. They held a forum on how to reduce sexual violence against women in conflict zones — an issue she has often spoken about. Alastair Grant /PA Photos /Landov hide caption

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