Work Work

Christopher Mensah, owner and tattoo artist at the Pinz-N-Needlez tattoo shop in Washington, D.C., creates the outline for Oshun Afrique's 35th tattoo. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

For Tattoo Artists, Race Is In The Mix When Ink Meets Skin

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Ginger, an English bulldog, stands watch while at work with her owner, Will Pisnieski, at Authentic Entertainment in Burbank, Calif., in 2012. According to the Society for Human Resource Management, 7 percent of employers allow pets at work. Grant Hindsley/AP hide caption

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Grant Hindsley/AP

Who Let The Dogs In? More Companies Welcome Pets At Work

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A drawing of the first White House designed by architect James Hoban, who won the competition to design the president's new house in 1792. Building began that year and ended in 1800. AP hide caption

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AP

Slave Labor And The 'Longer History' Of The White House

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Jason Olsen, a 39-year-old policy adviser for the Department of Labor, uses the Washington, D.C., Metro to commute to work three times a week. On the other days of the week, Olsen telecommutes from home to avoid the challenge of taking the Metro. Ruby Wallau/NPR hide caption

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Ruby Wallau/NPR

Workplaces Can Be Particularly Stressful For Disabled Americans, Poll Finds

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Jonathan McHugh/Getty Images/Ikon Images

In 2016, Talking Politics Can Make Things Uncomfortable At Work

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One Silicon Valley startup that encouraged its employees to think about work 24/7 found they missed market signals, tanked deals and became too irritable to build crucial working relationships. Hill Street Studios/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hill Street Studios/Blend Images/Getty Images

Many Grouchy, Error-Prone Workers Just Need More Sleep

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The writer, Rachael Cusick, is pictured with chef Oneil Wilson, her co-worker in the kitchen during a summer job as a line cook, during the breakfast shift. Courtesy of Rachael Cusick hide caption

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Courtesy of Rachael Cusick

Victoria Ruiz (left), a postdoctoral fellow in immunology, works with Brianna Delgado, a high school student that she mentors, at the Blaser Lab, inside NYU's Langone Medical Center in New York, NY. Ramsay de Give for NPR hide caption

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Ramsay de Give for NPR

Too Few University Jobs For America's Young Scientists

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Randen Patterson left a research career in physiology at U.C. Davis when funding got too tight. He now owns a grocery store in Guinda, Calif. Max Whittaker/Prime for NPR hide caption

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Max Whittaker/Prime for NPR

When Scientists Give Up

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After laying off roughly 2 million workers during the recession, the construction industry may not have enough crews to keep up with demand for building projects. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Construction Industry Missing Key Tool: Skilled Workers

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We can all work up a stinky sweat — welders, ballerinas and number-crunchers alike. Would you want to know? emreogan/iStockphoto hide caption

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emreogan/iStockphoto

Coping With A Co-Worker's Body Odor Takes Tact

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Lucinda Schreiber for NPR

When Work Becomes A Haven From Stress At Home

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