Football Football

Olson sits with his guide dog, Quebec. Inspired by his experiences with the USC Trojans as a 12-year-old, Olson tried out for his high school football team. Gloria Hillard for NPR hide caption

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Gloria Hillard for NPR

A Blind Football Player Joins His Trojan Heroes On The Field

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The public share to pay for construction of a new Minnesota Vikings football stadium is reportedly $498 million. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

Spending Public Money On Sports Stadiums Is Bad Business

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Chris Kluwe (left) congratulates Blair Walsh after Walsh kicked a 56-yard field goal during a game against the Houston Texans in 2012. Kluwe says friendships in the NFL can be fleeting, but also close. Patric Schneider/AP hide caption

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Patric Schneider/AP

The Locker Room: A Melting Pot, Where Football's The Focal Point

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Kicker Chandler Catanzaro of the Arizona Cardinals kicks an extra point against the Kansas City Chiefs during a pre-season NFL game at the University of Phoenix Stadium on Aug. 15 in Glendale, Ariz. Christian Petersen/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Petersen/Getty Images

Why Is There An Extra Point In Football, And Do We Need It?

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NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell admitted last September that he "got it wrong" when it came to handling the recent Ray Rice incident, pledging that he will get it right. Dennis Van Tine /UPI/Landov hide caption

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Dennis Van Tine /UPI/Landov

NFL's Effort To Combat Domestic Violence May Go For The Long Game

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New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady gestures during an event at Salem State University in Salem, Mass. on May 7, 2015. An NFL investigation has found that New England Patriots employees likely deflated footballs and Brady was "at least generally aware" of the rules violations. Now, he faces a four-game suspension and the Patriots a $1 million fine. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Was 'Deflategate' About Tom Brady's Legacy Or His Ego?

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The e-book's original cover image was used without permission, according to a lawsuit filed against Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Apple. Amazon via The Daily Beast hide caption

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Amazon via The Daily Beast

An Ohio Couple Would Like To Forget 'A Gronking To Remember'

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Oklahoma's Buddy Hield (right) and Denzel Valentine of Michigan State played in Friday's East Regional Semifinal of the 2015 NCAA tournament in Syracuse. If you've got money riding on this year's NCAA tournament, you might want to hear about what happened to John Bovary's football pool. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

The Cautionary Tale Of A Big-Time Bracket Bust

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San Francisco 49ers linebacker Chris Borland, center, during an NFL football game in Santa Clara, Calif. Borland announced that he will retire after just one season to protect himself from brain injuries. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

'Borland Effect' A Fumble For Football? Deford Says It Will Pass

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