American History American History

Archivist Amy McDonald invited some co-workers to help her re-create cherries jubilee from a university cookbook. But even with a historical paper trail, there were still things they couldn't figure out, like what to do after it starts flaming. Jerry Young/Getty Images hide caption

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Jerry Young/Getty Images

The upstairs porch of Anne Blessing's home in Charleston, S.C., has been a stop on a popular historic home tour. For the first time, visitors will tour the kitchen where enslaved people once spent most of their lives toiling over hot fires. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Looking 'Beyond The Big House' And Into The Lives Of Slaves

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A group of men with full glasses proudly pose with their keg of beer in San Francisco, 1895. Underwood Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Underwood Archives/Getty Images

How The Story Of Beer Is The Story Of America

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Donald Trump plays a round of golf after the opening of The Trump International Golf Links Course on July 10, 2012, in Balmedie, Scotland. Ian MacNicol/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian MacNicol/Getty Images

Trump, The Golfer In Chief

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An Army horse wears a gas mask to guard against German gas attacks. Courtesy of U.S. National Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of U.S. National Archives

The Unsung Equestrian Heroes Of World War I And The Plot To Poison Them

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In 1957, Duncan Hines and his wife, Clara, cut a cake at the Duncan Hines test kitchen in Ithaca, N.Y. Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU hide caption

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Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU

Ruby Lortie (center, wearing black), marches to get out the vote with other fifth-grade students from Boulder Community School of Integrated Studies in Boulder, Colo. Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio

These Fifth-Graders Think It's Really, Really Important That You Vote

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President Obama speaks during the dedication ceremony for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

This version of Baked Alaska at Delmonico's restaurant in New York City stays true to the original: a walnut sponge cake layered with apricot compote and banana gelato, covered with torched meringue. Courtesy of Delmonico's Restaurant hide caption

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Courtesy of Delmonico's Restaurant

The new African Burying Ground Memorial Park was dedicated on Saturday in Portsmouth, N.H. Emily Corwin/NHPR hide caption

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Emily Corwin/NHPR

In New England, Recognizing A Little-Known History Of Slavery

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John Wilkes Booth was the son of prominent, wealthy actors. He, too, became an actor and was so popular, he was one of the first to have his clothes ripped off by fans. Hulton Archive/Getty hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty

Who Was John Wilkes Booth Before He Became Lincoln's Assassin?

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Spider Martin's most well-known photograph, Two Minute Warning, shows marchers facing a line of state troopers in Selma moments before police beat the protestors on March 7, 1965. The day became known as Bloody Sunday. Spider Martin/Courtesy Tracy Martin hide caption

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Spider Martin/Courtesy Tracy Martin

Photographer Helped Expose Brutality Of Selma's 'Bloody Sunday'

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