Donald Trump plays a round of golf after the opening of The Trump International Golf Links Course on July 10, 2012, in Balmedie, Scotland. Ian MacNicol/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian MacNicol/Getty Images

Trump, The Golfer In Chief

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An Army horse wears a gas mask to guard against German gas attacks. Courtesy of U.S. National Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of U.S. National Archives

The Unsung Equestrian Heroes Of World War I And The Plot To Poison Them

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In 1957, Duncan Hines and his wife, Clara, cut a cake at the Duncan Hines test kitchen in Ithaca, N.Y. Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU hide caption

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Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU

Ruby Lortie (center, wearing black), marches to get out the vote with other fifth-grade students from Boulder Community School of Integrated Studies in Boulder, Colo. Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio

These Fifth-Graders Think It's Really, Really Important That You Vote

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President Obama speaks during the dedication ceremony for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

This version of Baked Alaska at Delmonico's restaurant in New York City stays true to the original: a walnut sponge cake layered with apricot compote and banana gelato, covered with torched meringue. Courtesy of Delmonico's Restaurant hide caption

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Courtesy of Delmonico's Restaurant

The new African Burying Ground Memorial Park was dedicated on Saturday in Portsmouth, N.H. Emily Corwin/NHPR hide caption

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Emily Corwin/NHPR

In New England, Recognizing A Little-Known History Of Slavery

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John Wilkes Booth was the son of prominent, wealthy actors. He, too, became an actor and was so popular, he was one of the first to have his clothes ripped off by fans. Hulton Archive/Getty hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty

Who Was John Wilkes Booth Before He Became Lincoln's Assassin?

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Spider Martin's most well-known photograph, Two Minute Warning, shows marchers facing a line of state troopers in Selma moments before police beat the protestors on March 7, 1965. The day became known as Bloody Sunday. Spider Martin/Courtesy Tracy Martin hide caption

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Spider Martin/Courtesy Tracy Martin

Photographer Helped Expose Brutality Of Selma's 'Bloody Sunday'

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Whitney Plantation owner John Cummings has commissioned stark artwork for the site, including realistic statues of slave children found throughout the museum. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

New Museum Depicts 'The Life Of A Slave From Cradle To The Tomb'

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Great Dismal Swamp, in Virginia and North Carolina, was once thought to be haunted. For generations of escaped slaves, says archaeologist Dan Sayers, the swamp was a haven. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Fleeing To Dismal Swamp, Slaves And Outcasts Found Freedom

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One of America's favorite bites: the hotdog. Here, a man and women enjoy the dogs at a California fair in 1905. Courtesy of Sourcebooks hide caption

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Courtesy of Sourcebooks

A Journey Through The History Of American Food In 100 Bites

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1st Lt. Alonzo Cushing, shown in an undated photo provided by the Wisconsin Historical Society, is expected to get the nation's highest military decoration --€” the Medal of Honor --” this summer, nearly 150 years after he died at the Battle of Gettysburg. Wisconsin Historical Society/AP hide caption

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Wisconsin Historical Society/AP

Waverly Adcock, a sergeant and founder of the West Augusta Guard, prepares his company for inspection and battle at a Civil War re-enactment in Virginia. Sara Smith, whose great-great-grandfather was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, holds the Confederate battle flag. Courtesy of Jesse Dukes hide caption

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Courtesy of Jesse Dukes

Six Words: 'Must We Forget Our Confederate Ancestors?'

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