An image grab taken from an AFPTV video released on Saturday shows people gathering amidst at the site of a car bomb attack in the rebel-held town of Azaz in northern Syria. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Several previous cease-fires have collapsed after a matter of days,€” but there is hope that this one will hold. On Saturday the U.N. Security Council supported the efforts by Russia and Turkey to end the violence. AP hide caption

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AP

Syrians walk past destroyed buildings in the former rebel-held Ansari district in Aleppo last Friday after Syrian government forces regained control of the divided city. George Ourfalian/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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People gather near a Turkish army tank in Istanbul on July 16, after a group within Turkey's military attempted a coup. Since then, more than 100,000 people been detained, fired or suspended from their jobs on suspicion of sympathizing with or aiding the coup attempt. Defne Karadeniz/Getty Images hide caption

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Defne Karadeniz/Getty Images

Fearing Arrest At Home, Turkish Military Officers Seek Asylum In U.S.

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In Moscow, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (right) and Turkey's Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu offer flowers in memory of Andrei Karlov, Russia's ambassador to Turkey. Karlov was fatally shot Monday in Ankara. Maxim Shemetov/AP hide caption

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Marina Karlov, the wife of slain Russian Ambassador to Turkey Andrei Karlov, lays her head on his coffin during a ceremony at Esenboga International Airport on Tuesday in Ankara, Turkey. Erhan Ortac/Getty Images hide caption

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An Associated Press photographer at the scene reports this man shot Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, at a photo gallery in Ankara on Monday. Burhan Ozbilici/AP hide caption

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Burhan Ozbilici/AP

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg (left) met in Istanbul Monday. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Stark Choice For NATO's Turkish Officers: Arrests At Home, Limbo In Europe

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Narragansett turkeys have free range of 12 acres on Dana Kee's Moose Manor Farm, located along the Potomac River in Maryland. Allison Aubrey/NPR hide caption

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Allison Aubrey/NPR

Heritage Turkeys Make A Comeback, But To Save Them We Must Eat Them

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Turkish women protest against a government proposal on Tuesday in Istanbul, Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016. The sign in the middle reads: "We will not allow legalized rape with marriage!" Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Turkey's Trump Towers rise above the Sisli district in Istanbul, the city's European side. In this case it's Trump in name only – the Turkish owners paid for the right to use the name Trump Towers. Offices are situated above a shopping mall. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP

Turkey's Leader And Supporters Give Trump Benefit Of The Doubt — For Now

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Cumhuriyet newspaper readers protested the government's detaining of its editor-in-chief and others this week. An Istanbul court has ordered nine of the paper's journalists to be held in prison pending trial. Basin Foto Ajansi/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Basin Foto Ajansi/LightRocket via Getty Images

Turkish police officers take cover after the blast in the majority-Kurdish city of Diyarbakir on Friday. The car bomb was detonated hours after the government detained 12 pro-Kurdish legislators. Ilyas Akengin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A man holds up the latest copy of Turkey's opposition Cumhuriyet newspaper outside its headquarters after Turkish police reportedly detained the chief editor and at least eight of its senior staff on Monday. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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The debit card the European Union is funding for 1 million Syrian refugees in Turkey, shown in a mock-up, would provide about $30 per person per month to each family member. The idea is to help the refugees in Turkey and keep them from going to countries in Europe. Gokce Saracoglu for NPR hide caption

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Gokce Saracoglu for NPR

Europe's Aid Plan For Syrian Refugees: A Million Debit Cards

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