Turkish soldiers stand guard in the town of Akcakale, just across the border from Syria, on Oct. 4. The Turks have often issued stern warnings and retaliated when shooting from the Syrian war has come across their border. But Turkey did not respond to an incident over the weekend. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After Superstorm Sandy, the Food Bank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties in Neptune, N.J., is filled with water bottles, canned food and other goods. But these supplies are going out almost as fast as they come in. Amy Walters/NPR hide caption

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European settlers almost wiped out North America's native wild turkey. But conservation efforts have proved successful. There are now nearly 7 million birds found across 49 states. Larry Price, National Wild Turkey Federation/NWTF.org hide caption

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Damage inside the burnt U.S. consulate in Benghazi after an attack on the building Sept. 11. Gianluigi Guercia/Getty Images hide caption

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Three suicide car bombings rocked the center of Aleppo in northern Syria on Wednesday, killing dozens and causing extensive damage. SANA/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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The Two-Way

Turkey Fires On Northern Syria In Response To Rocket Attack

The city is divided after months of fighting. In the latest attack, dozens were killed in suicide bombings that appear to be the work of rebels.

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Syrians fleeing increased violence arriving last week at the border between the Syrian town of Azaz and the neighboring Turkish town of Kilis. Phil Moore/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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From the Human Rights Watch report: "Detainees described being folded at the waist and having their head, neck, and legs put into a car tire so that they were immobilized and could not protect themselves from beatings on the back, legs, and head including by batons and whips." Human Rights Watch hide caption

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