Turkey Turkey

A child leans on the coffin of his uncle, Habibullah Sefer, on Thursday. Sefer, along with more than 40 other people, was killed in a suicide attack on Tuesday at the Ataturk airport in Istanbul. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Bullet impacts are pictured at Istanbul's Ataturk airport on Wednesday, a day after a suicide bombing and gun attack killed more than 40 people. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Passengers leave Istanbul Ataturk, Turkey's largest airport, after a suicide bomb attack Tuesday killed at least 42 people and wounded more than 230 people. Defne Karadeniz/Getty Images hide caption

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Defne Karadeniz/Getty Images

U.S. Envoy: 'We're Taking Out' About 1 ISIS Leader Every 3 Days

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Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks on Monday at the presidential palace in Ankara. Turkey is now embroiled in conflicts with Syria's President Bashar Assad, the Islamic State and the Kurdish separatists. Murat Cetinmuhurdar/AP hide caption

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Murat Cetinmuhurdar/AP

Workers clean the debris from yesterday's blasts at Ataturk Airport in Istanbul on Wednesday. Defne Karadeniz/Getty Images hide caption

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Defne Karadeniz/Getty Images

'I heard the shooting ... '

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People wait outside the Ataturk airport in Istanbul, where dozens have died in an attack on Tuesday. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images

Attack At Istanbul's International Airport Kills More Than 30 People

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Pope Francis (center), flanked by the head of Armenia's Orthodox Church Karekin II (seventh left) and Catholicos Aram I (sixth right), celebrated an Armenian-Rite Mass in St. Peter's Basilica in April 2015. Pope Francis called the slaughter of Armenians by Ottoman Turks "the first genocide of the 20th century," sparking a diplomatic rift with Turkey. L'Osservatore Romano/AP hide caption

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L'Osservatore Romano/AP

Activists with a group that advocated for recognition of the Armenian genocide react at the German Parliament after lawmakers voted to recognize the Armenian genocide. The posters read, "#RecognitionNow says Thanks!" Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

Armed men in uniform identified by Syrian Democratic forces as U.S. special operations forces ride in the back of a pickup truck in the village of Fatisah in the northern Syrian province of Raqqa on Wednesday. Delil Souleiman /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman /AFP/Getty Images

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (left) and Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu pose for a photograph at the start of a meeting in Ankara, Turkey, on Wednesday. Davutoglu announced Thursday he would resign. Murat Cetinmuhurdar/AP hide caption

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Murat Cetinmuhurdar/AP

People walk in front of Istanbul's Hagia Sophia on April 12. Turkey has seen tourist numbers plummet following a series of deadly terrorist attacks and a travel ban by Russia. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Terrorism Fears And Travel Bans Shake Tourism In Turkey

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"My home," exclaims Movses Haneshyan, on seeing the enlarged image presented to him by photographer Diana Markosian. He'd fled with his father at age 5. Diana Markosian hide caption

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Diana Markosian

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks to the media following talks with German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the German federal Chancellery on February 4 in Berlin. Adam Berry/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Berry/Getty Images