Brain scans using Amyvid dye to highlight beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. Clockwise from top left: a cognitively normal subject; an amyloid-positive patient with Alzheimer's disease; a patient with mild cognitive impairment who progressed to dementia during a study; and a patient with mild cognitive impairment. Slide courtesy of the journal Neurology hide caption

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Despite Uneven Results, Alzheimer's Research Suggests A Path For Treatment

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Treatment For Alzheimer's Should Start Years Before Disease Sets In

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A PET scan of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease. U.S. National Institute on Aging/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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A PET scan of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease. U.S. National Institute on Aging/via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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A PET scan of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease. U.S. National Institute on Aging/via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Gene Mutation Offers Clue For Drugs To Stave Off Alzheimer's

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TimeSlips is a program based on the idea that storytelling can be therapeutic for people with dementia. Dick Blau/TimeSlips hide caption

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Alzheimer's Patients Turn To Stories Instead Of Memories

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PET scans of the brains of a person with normal memory ability and someone diagnosed with Alzheimer's Image courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health hide caption

toggle caption Image courtesy of the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health