Scientists hope a new genetically modified rat will help them find Alzheimer's drugs that work on humans. Ryumin Alexander/ITAR-TASS/Landov hide caption

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Ryumin Alexander/ITAR-TASS/Landov

Genetically Modified Rat Is Promising Model For Alzheimer's

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Social worker Nuria Casulleres shows a portrait of Audrey Hepburn to elderly men during a memory activity at the Cuidem La Memoria elderly home in Barcelona, Spain, last August. The home specializes in Alzheimer's patients. David Ramos/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ramos/Getty Images

Alzheimer's 'Epidemic' Now A Deadlier Threat To Elderly

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Scientists have found that bilingual seniors are better at skills that can fade with age than their monolingual peers. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Brain scans using Amyvid dye to highlight beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. Clockwise from top left: a cognitively normal subject; an amyloid-positive patient with Alzheimer's disease; a patient with mild cognitive impairment who progressed to dementia during a study; and a patient with mild cognitive impairment. Slide courtesy of the journal Neurology hide caption

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Slide courtesy of the journal Neurology

Despite Uneven Results, Alzheimer's Research Suggests A Path For Treatment

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Treatment For Alzheimer's Should Start Years Before Disease Sets In

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A PET scan of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease. U.S. National Institute on Aging/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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U.S. National Institute on Aging/Wikimedia Commons

A PET scan of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease. U.S. National Institute on Aging/via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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U.S. National Institute on Aging/via Wikimedia Commons

A PET scan of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease. U.S. National Institute on Aging/via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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U.S. National Institute on Aging/via Wikimedia Commons

Gene Mutation Offers Clue For Drugs To Stave Off Alzheimer's

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TimeSlips is a program based on the idea that storytelling can be therapeutic for people with dementia. Dick Blau/TimeSlips hide caption

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Dick Blau/TimeSlips

Alzheimer's Patients Turn To Stories Instead Of Memories

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