Isabel Seliger for NPR

A Remote Town, A Closed-Off Courtroom, And A Father Facing Deportation

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Pedro Figueroa, 31, reported his car stolen. When San Francisco law enforcement officers found out there was a warrant for his arrest, they called federal immigration officials. Courtesy of Jon Rodney hide caption

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Man Reports Car Stolen, Ends Up In Deportation Limbo

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An adult immigrant from El Salvador who entered the country illegally wears an ankle monitor July 27 at a shelter in San Antonio. Lawyers representing immigrant mothers held in a South Texas detention center say the women have been denied counsel and coerced into accepting ankle-monitoring bracelets as a condition of release, even after judges made clear that paying their bonds would suffice. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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As Asylum Seekers Swap Prison Beds For Ankle Bracelets, Same Firm Profits

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U.S. Immigration Agency Again Drops 'Family Friendly' Detention Centers

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Boys wait in line to make a phone call at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Arizona in June. Many of the minors who arrived from Central America last year are now awaiting court hearings to determine if they can stay in the U.S. Ross D. Franklin/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Many Unaccompanied Minors No Longer Alone, But Still In Limbo

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Maria Isabel de la Paz, a U.S. citizen, was twice turned away when trying to enter the U.S. legally. When she attempted an illegal crossing, her case was decided by a Border Patrol agent, not an immigration judge. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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Born In The U.S. But Turned Back At The Border, Time After Time

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Justice Department Moves To Further Rein In Racial Profiling

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Philadelphia City Councilwoman Maria Quinones-Sanchez pushed for the city to change its practice of detaining immigrants on behalf of federal officials. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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More Municipalities Deny Federal Requests, Won't Detain Immigrants

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Young migrants seen apprehended by the Border Patrol near the Rio Grande in Hidalgo, TX, earlier this year. The next stop for many is either a detention center or deportation. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Neyoy Ruiz, 36, moved into a Tucson church with his family last month, claiming sanctuary as he sought a reversal in his deportation order. Fernanda Echavarri/Arizona Public Media hide caption

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A migrant from El Salvador holds a map he received from church workers at the Mexico-Guatemala border. It shows the freight train schedules and routes to the U.S. border. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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A Flood Of Kids, On Their Own, Hope To Hop A Train To A New Life

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Audience members listen to President Obama speak about immigration reform in El Paso, Texas, in May 2011. The Obama campaign is wooing Hispanics ahead of the November elections, but the president's deportation policy is being criticized by immigrant advocates. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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