Immigration and Customs Enforcement Immigration and Customs Enforcement

Florinda Lorenzo came to the U.S. from Guatemala 14 years ago. She checks in with ICE regularly — a requirement stemming from a 2010 arrest, though the charges were later dropped. She says the check-ins have become "painful and stressful" because she's worried she will be detained. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Once Routine, ICE Check-Ins Now Fill Immigrants In U.S. Illegally With Anxiety

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An Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in Phoenix, Ariz., on Apr. 28, 2010. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

When Sheriffs Refuse An ICE Detainment Request, They Get Called Out

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Local officials are promising a legal fight in the face of a block on grants from the Justice Department over immigration enforcement. Here, protesters pray outside the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in New York City this month. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers escort a man who was arrested in a New York City apartment building. New York is a city that won't detain noncitizens on behalf of the federal government. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP
Eunice Esomonu/NPR

How Did We Get To 11 Million Unauthorized Immigrants?

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Adrian Ventura is the director of Centro Comunitario de Trabajadores, or Community Workers Center, which was founded in the aftermath of the raid. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

10 Years After The New Bedford ICE Raid, Immigrant Community Has Hope

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Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in February in Los Angeles. The mayor of the city has asked ICE agents not to identify themselves as police during operations. Bryan Cox/AP hide caption

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Bryan Cox/AP

Jeanette Vizguerra, a Mexican woman seeking to avoid deportation from the United States, speaks Wednesday as she holds her 6-year-old daughter, Zuri, during a news conference in a Denver church in which Vizguerra and her children have taken refuge. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Sanctuary Churches Brace For Clash With Trump Administration

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An Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent detains an immigrant in 2015 in Los Angeles. A new round of detentions this week has triggered complaints from immigrant advocates. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Immigration Raids Are Reported Around The Country

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Family members and supporters of Guadalupe Garcia de Rayos gather at a news conference outside the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Phoenix on Thursday. Steve Fluty/AP hide caption

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Steve Fluty/AP

Guadalupe García de Rayos, shown here outside the Phoenix office of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, was deported after more than two decades of living in the U.S. Matthew Casey/KJZZ hide caption

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Matthew Casey/KJZZ

Lorenzo Palma (center) reviews family documents with his brother and mother in their home in El Paso, Texas. Palma served time for a parole violation and, just as he was being released, was sent before an immigration court to prove his U.S. citizenship. Bree Lamb for NPR hide caption

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Bree Lamb for NPR

An undated still image shows men at a Tucson facility wrapped in Mylar sheets and sitting on concrete floors and benches. CBP/American Immigration Council hide caption

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CBP/American Immigration Council

The family of Kate Steinle is suing San Francisco and two federal agencies over her killing last year. In this 2015 photo are Brad Steinle, Liz Sullivan and Jim Steinle, her brother, mother and father. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Detained immigrant children line up in the cafeteria at the Karnes County Residential Center, in Karnes City, Texas, a temporary home for immigrant women and children detained at the border. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP
Isabel Seliger for NPR

A Remote Town, A Closed-Off Courtroom, And A Father Facing Deportation

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Pedro Figueroa, 31, reported his car stolen. When San Francisco law enforcement officers found out there was a warrant for his arrest, they called federal immigration officials. Courtesy of Jon Rodney hide caption

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Courtesy of Jon Rodney

Man Reports Car Stolen, Ends Up In Deportation Limbo

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An adult immigrant from El Salvador who entered the country illegally wears an ankle monitor July 27 at a shelter in San Antonio. Lawyers representing immigrant mothers held in a South Texas detention center say the women have been denied counsel and coerced into accepting ankle-monitoring bracelets as a condition of release, even after judges made clear that paying their bonds would suffice. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

As Asylum Seekers Swap Prison Beds For Ankle Bracelets, Same Firm Profits

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U.S. Immigration Agency Again Drops 'Family Friendly' Detention Centers

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Boys wait in line to make a phone call at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Arizona in June. Many of the minors who arrived from Central America last year are now awaiting court hearings to determine if they can stay in the U.S. Ross D. Franklin/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/Pool/Getty Images

Many Unaccompanied Minors No Longer Alone, But Still In Limbo

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