Foreign nationals being arrested Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, during a targeted enforcement operation conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) aimed at immigration fugitives, re-entrants and at-large criminal aliens in Los Angeles. Charles Reed/AP hide caption

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Charles Reed/AP

A Milwaukee police officer stands before the remains of a bar last summer, after police there faced off with protesters following the police shooting of a black man. For decades, interactions between police and people of color in the Midwestern city have been fraught, and those encounters are the subject of a new lawsuit brought by the ACLU. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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This week, Code Switch listeners share their concerns and frustrations for the first hundred days of the new presidential administration. Andrew Biraj/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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So, What Are You Afraid of Now?

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People attend an immigration rally outside the Supreme Court in June. Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Supreme Court To Consider How Long Immigrants May Be Detained Without Bond Hearing

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Jameel Jaffer, deputy legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, listens during a hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, in July 2013. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Outgoing ACLU Director Reviews Tenure Fighting National Security Battles

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Last year, the ACLU of Colorado discovered nearly 800 cases where people had gone to jail in Colorado Springs, Colo., when they couldn't pay their tickets for minor violations. Pictured above is Alamo Square Park, site of the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum. Michael Bullock/Getty images hide caption

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Colorado Springs Will Stop Jailing People Too Poor To Pay Court Fines

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Need A Public Defender In New Orleans? Get In Line

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School Board Approves Controversial Deal In Transgender Student Case

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Remembering Al Bendich, Fierce Defender Of Free Speech

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Maria Isabel de la Paz, a U.S. citizen, was twice turned away when trying to enter the U.S. legally. When she attempted an illegal crossing, her case was decided by a Border Patrol agent, not an immigration judge. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Born In The U.S. But Turned Back At The Border, Time After Time

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This encampment under the Julia Tuttle Causeway in Miami, shown in 2008, was cleared out by authorities in 2009. It was home to sex offenders who were unable to find places where they were permitted to live under Miami-Dade County's strict residency law. Although this makeshift community was broken up, homeless sex offenders continue to camp out in other areas of the county. David Adame/AP hide caption

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David Adame/AP

ACLU Challenges Miami Law On Behalf Of Homeless Sex Offenders

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