An ACLU representative speaks with Rep. Don Beyer, D-Va., during a protest at Dulles International Airport in Virginia on Jan. 29, 2017. The ACLU is suing for documents related to implementation of the president's travel ban. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

The number of people who have been asked to hand over their cellphones and passwords by Customs and Border Protection agents has increased nearly threefold in recent years. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

More Travelers Entering U.S. Are Being Asked For Their Cellphones And Passwords

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Foreign nationals being arrested Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017, during a targeted enforcement operation conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) aimed at immigration fugitives, re-entrants and at-large criminal aliens in Los Angeles. Charles Reed/AP hide caption

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Charles Reed/AP

A Milwaukee police officer stands before the remains of a bar last summer, after police there faced off with protesters following the police shooting of a black man. For decades, interactions between police and people of color in the Midwestern city have been fraught, and those encounters are the subject of a new lawsuit brought by the ACLU. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

This week, Code Switch listeners share their concerns and frustrations for the first hundred days of the new presidential administration. Andrew Biraj/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Biraj/AFP/Getty Images

So, What Are You Afraid of Now?

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People attend an immigration rally outside the Supreme Court in June. Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Supreme Court To Consider How Long Immigrants May Be Detained Without Bond Hearing

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Jameel Jaffer, deputy legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union, listens during a hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill, in July 2013. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Outgoing ACLU Director Reviews Tenure Fighting National Security Battles

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Last year, the ACLU of Colorado discovered nearly 800 cases where people had gone to jail in Colorado Springs, Colo., when they couldn't pay their tickets for minor violations. Pictured above is Alamo Square Park, site of the Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum. Michael Bullock/Getty images hide caption

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Michael Bullock/Getty images

Colorado Springs Will Stop Jailing People Too Poor To Pay Court Fines

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