Jill Tahmooressi stands outside the Mexican Consulate in Miami, in May to protest the arrest of her son in Mexico. He was released by a federal judge in Mexico today. J Pat Carter/AP hide caption

itoggle caption J Pat Carter/AP

Three large crosses lean against the burned out facade of Iguala's City Hall. Masked protesters angry about the disappearance of 43 students — attacked on orders of Iguala's mayor, according to Mexican federal authorities — burned the building last week. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Carrie Kahn/NPR

Elaborately decorated skulls are crafted from pure sugar and given to friends as gifts. The colorful designs represent the vitality of life and individual personality. Karen Castillo Farfán /NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Karen Castillo Farfán /NPR

In Mexico City on Wednesday, people march to demand justice for 43 missing students. Mexican authorities ordered the arrest of the mayor of Iguala and his wife in connection with the attack. Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

Students chant slogans in front of the Attorney General Office in Mexico City on Wednesday during a protest over the 43 students missing in Iguala, Guerrero State. Omar Torres/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Groups of rural and community police arrive in the city of Iguala on Tuesday to help in the search for 43 students who disappeared after a confrontation with local police on Sept. 26. Miguel Tovar/STF/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Miguel Tovar/STF/LatinContent/Getty Images

A woman wears a black veil and carries a cross reading in Spanish "Assassin State," as thousands march down one of the capital's main boulevards to demand that the government find the 43 students who disappeared in southern Guerrero State. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Relatives of students reported missing after a violent confrontation in Iguala with police, pass the time near a makeshift altar as they wait for news of their loved ones at the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college in Ayotzinapa, Mexico. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Eduardo Verdugo/AP

President Johnson and Mexican President Gustavo Di­az Ordaz, with their wives, celebrate the dedication of the Chamizal Monument in Juarez, Mexico, on Oct. 28, 1967. The monument signified the international boundary marker between the two countries, designated in 1964. Yoichi Okam/Courtesy of the LBJ Presidential Library hide caption

itoggle caption Yoichi Okam/Courtesy of the LBJ Presidential Library

Waves hit the coast of Los Cabos, Mexico, on Sunday as Hurricane Odile nears landfall in the largely tourist area of the Baja California peninsula. Victor R. Caivano/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Victor R. Caivano/AP

Migrants at a shelter in southern Mexico say that Mexico's interior checkpoints are making it harder to travel north. Some have given up on reaching the U.S. and are trying to stay in Mexico. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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A man looks out towards the US from the Mexican side of the border fence that divides the two countries in San Diego. The U.S. Border Patrol says it has seen about a 60 percent drop in the number of Central Americans apprehended at the border. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Immigrants run to jump on a train in Ixtepec, Mexico, during their journey toward the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama wants nearly $4 billion in emergency funds to deal with the tens of thousands of children from Central America who've been crossing the border. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Eduardo Verdugo/AP

Reny Pineda was born in Michoacan, Mexico, but grew up in Los Angeles. In 2010 he returned to his homeland, and joined a vigilante battle against a ruthless cartel ruling the region. Now the Mexican government has ordered the civilian militias to disband, and Pineda picks lemons in this orchard. Alan Ortega /KQED hide caption

itoggle caption Alan Ortega /KQED

Rowan Jacobsen, in the canoe, and Pete McBride and Sam Walton, on stand-up paddleboards, travel through the upper limitrophe of the delta reach (the section marking the U.S.-Mexico border). Before the dam release, Jacobsen described this parched riverbed as a scene of "Mad Max misery." The temporary flow of water helped bolster native habitats that survive here. Courtesy Fred Phillips hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy Fred Phillips

A migrant from El Salvador holds a map he received from church workers at the Mexico-Guatemala border. It shows the freight train schedules and routes to the U.S. border. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Carrie Kahn/NPR