Gabriel Zepeda (right) makes an all-terrain wheelchair. He's been making wheelchairs for low-income Mexicans for 27 years. Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR hide caption

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Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR

Mexico And U.S. Team Up To Create Low-Cost Wheelchairs

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Archaeologists working at the Templo Mayor site of Aztec ruins in Mexico City, in August 2015. Scientists say the remains of women and children are among those found at a main trophy rack of human skulls, known as "tzompantli." Hector Montano/AP hide caption

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Hector Montano/AP

Bartender Robin Miller mixes a round of mezcal margaritas at Espita Mezcaleria in Washington, D.C. As U.S. drinkers embrace mezcal, investors are flocking south to the heart of Mexico's mezcal country, and local incomes are rising. Kevin Leahy/NPR hide caption

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America's Growing Taste For Mezcal Is Good For Mexico's Small Producers

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Jorge Santiago Aguirre, a human rights lawyer in Mexico City, clicked on a link in a text message he received last year asking for his help. Nothing happened. But days later, audio was leaked of a call between Aguirre and one of his clients. The call had been heavily edited and painted both men as criminals. James Frederick hide caption

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James Frederick

Mexico's Government Is Accused Of Targeting Journalists And Activists With Spyware

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Miguel Angel Covarrubias Cervantes, a former mayor in central Mexico, posted a video of him delivering a speech inspired by a Netflix promotional video for House of Cards. Miguel Cervantes/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Miguel Cervantes/Screenshot by NPR

Orlando, whose nickname is the Wolf, is a human smuggler in Matamoros who says far fewer people want to employ his services and jump the border, with the Trump administration. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Illegal Border Crossings Are Down, And So Is Business For Smugglers

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Crew members from Sea Shepherds cut up and separate more than 300 pieces of illegal fishing gear they've retrieved from the water. The recovered nets are shipped off to a company that turns them into consumer products, including Adidas shoes. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

In Mexico, A Last-Ditch Effort To Save The Vaquita, On The Verge Of Extinction

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Countries that received the most remittance dollars from the U.S. in 2015 Brittany Mayes/NPR hide caption

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Brittany Mayes/NPR

A Proposed New Tax, Mainly On Latinos, To Pay For Trump's Border Wall

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Mexican marines arrive after an attack against the building of the Quintana Roo State Prosecution in Cancun earlier this year. A new report on armed conflicts included Mexico's drug cartel violence in its rankings. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Students at the Vida Independiente wheelchair workshop warm up before class. James Fredrick for NPR hide caption

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James Fredrick for NPR

Helping Wheelchair Users Navigate Mexico City's Hectic Streets And Sidewalks

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Close-up of tzoallis being made during a summer nutrition workshop held by Puente a la Salud, a group based in Oaxaca, Mexico, that is helping to push an amaranth comeback. An ancient Aztec staple, tzoallis are made of amaranth and corn flour, agave honey and amaranth cereal. Courtesy of Puente a la Salud Comunitaria hide caption

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Courtesy of Puente a la Salud Comunitaria

Trucks line up to cross to the United States near the Otay Commercial port of entry on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border on Jan. 25. Trump now says he will renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he has long criticized, rather than scrap it. Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images