Enrique Lima is a co-founder of Publish 88, a Mexican startup that develops software for publishing companies. Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR hide caption

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Mexico's Tech Startups Look To Overcome Barriers To Growth
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Images from posters made by relatives show 10 of the 12 young people kidnapped in broad daylight from a bar in Mexico City on May 26. No one has claimed responsibility for the brazen abduction. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Mass Kidnapping Puts Mexican Legal System On Trial
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Yanira Maldonado talked to reporters late Thursday after her release from a prison on the outskirts of Nogales, Mexico. Cristina Silva/AP hide caption

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Yanira Maldonado expresses her thanks
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Maria Carlotta Santa Maria is a single mother in Mexico and is the sole wage earner in her household. Women like her are becoming more common there, and the stigma once associated with having children out of wedlock is fading. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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As Stigma Eases, Single Motherhood In Mexico Is On The Rise
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Burned cars sit on a highway in Ecatepec near Mexico City, where a gas tanker truck exploded Tuesday. The explosion caused at least 20 deaths and widespread damage in the area. Victor Rojas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rescue workers are searching the debris in Mexico City, where an explosion Thursday rocked the headquarters of the state-owned oil company, Pemex. Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Infants used to be born at home to traditional midwives. Mónica Ortiz Uribe hide caption

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Mexico Aims To Save Babies And Moms With Modern Midwifery
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Mark Lennihan/AP
Why Mexico Is The World's Biggest Exporter Of Flat-Screen TVs
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Sept. 1, 2010: Police stood guard by a truck containing some of the bodies of immigrants killed by members of the Zetas drug cartel in Tamaulipas state. Jorge Dan/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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A worker separates tomatoes at a market in Mexico City. The Commerce Department says it might act to end a 16-year-old trade deal governing fresh Mexican tomatoes sold in the U.S. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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