Keith Gresham, 65, lines up four medications he takes at his home in Detroit in 2011. The self-employed painter was without health insurance for about a decade and was happy to finally turn 65 last year so he could qualify for Medicare. Patricia Beck/MCT/Landov hide caption

itoggle caption Patricia Beck/MCT/Landov

Medical marijuana advocates demonstrate outside a San Francisco fundraiser for President Obama in February. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman announced Thursday that his state will choose the federal health insurance exchange program. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Nati Harnik/AP

Problems with a computer system could delay work on health insurance exchanges. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

Health insurance plans that require consumers to pay more in out-of-pocket medical expenses may have hidden costs. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said last week the state could design its own health insurance exchange required under President Obama's health care law. But resistance in the Republican-controlled General Assembly may cause the state to hand that power off to the federal government. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Mark Humphrey/AP

Bruce Osterweil, 59, of San Francisco has long relied on his wife's employer-sponsored health plan for coverage, but she recently turned 65 and signed up for Medicare. She's going to retire in January and now Bruce is on his own to find a plan on the individual insurance market. Sarah Varney/KFF hide caption

itoggle caption Sarah Varney/KFF

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, seen at a news conference in early 2011 before he took office, promised to file a lawsuit soon after he was sworn in. He did. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Sue Ogrocki/AP