Chick-Fil-A employees Jennifer Cummins, right, and Joshua Figaretti work out in the gym during lunch at the company's corporate headquarters office in Hapeville, Ga. Increasingly employers are offering health plan incentives to encourage healthy behaviors from workers. Ric Feld/AP hide caption

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Ric Feld/AP

A shopper at a branch of South African retailer Pick n Pay in Johannesburg. Health insurer Discovery offers rebates on health food at the chain to its members who enroll in a health promotion program. SIPHIWE SIBEKO/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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SIPHIWE SIBEKO/Reuters /Landov

Patients say they feel little personal responsibility for keeping health costs lower. Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Andrei Tchernov/iStockphoto.com

Outside the office of Utah Gov. Herbert Friday, Betsy Ogden lays paper chains on a pile symbolizing uninsured state residents who would be covered by a Medicaid expansion. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Colonoscopy copay? Zero. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Luz Sepada, 59, lives in South Tucson, Ariz. Before the University of Arizona Health Plan assumed control of her medical care, Sepada was hospitalized 10 times in one year. After she was assigned a UAHP case manager, Sepada has been able to stay at home with no trips to the emergency department. Sarah Varney/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Varney/KHN

Arizona Seeks To Balance Patients And Profits With Home Care

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The heath exchange Mississippi Insurance Commissioner Mike Chaney had in mind got turned down by the federal government. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Utah got the go-ahead to run its own insurance exchange, but the federal blessing may not last. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Gov. Bill Haslam speaks to reporters after announcing in Nashville, Tenn., on Monday that that he had decided against creating a state-run health insurance exchange. The Republican governor said he will leave it to the federal government to run the marketplace. Erik Schelzig/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Erik Schelzig/ASSOCIATED PRESS