Kailash Sundaran (left), Devyn Greenberg and Devontae Freeland celebrate the Supreme Court's ruling upholding the Affordable Health Care Act outside the court Thursday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Countdown To The Supreme Court's Ruling On Health Care

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Jackson Cahn, who graduated from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Wash., is one of the 3 million young adults the Obama administration says would have risked going without insurance if the health care law hadn't allowed them to stay on their parents' policies. Because of the law, his mother, June Blender, was able to add him to her insurance. Courtesy of June Blender hide caption

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If Health Law Falls, Coverage For Young Adults Gets Tricky

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Attorney Paul Clement argued against the heath care overhaul at the Supreme Court in March. The decision on the law's constitutionality is expected any day. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Demonstrators both for and against the health care law turned out on the steps of the Supreme Court on March 27, the second day of oral arguments before the court. John Rose/NPR hide caption

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Insurers Wait For Verdict On Health Care Law And Their Bottom Line

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Mitt Romney (right), at the time the governor of Massachusetts, greets then-Health and Human Services Secretary Mike Leavitt during a National Governors Association forum in February 2006. Romney reportedly has tapped Leavitt to head his presidential transition team. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Amber Cooper lives in Modesto, Calif., with her 5-year-old son, Jaden, and her husband, Kevin. She had a liver transplant when she was 10 years old and has to take anti-rejection medication. Deanne Fitzmaurice for NPR hide caption

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Health Insurance Cutbacks Squeeze The Insured

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Reaction to President Obama's bombshell that he now supports gay marriage ran the gamut from profound to lighthearted. The White House/Getty Images hide caption

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