"DoggoLingo" is a language trend that's been gaining steam on the Internet in the past few years. Words like doggo, pupper and blep most often accompany a picture or video of a dog and have spread on social media. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

A galley proof shows some of the work that went into adding "ginormous" to Merriam-Webster's 2007 collegiate dictionary. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

From 'F-Bomb' To 'Photobomb,' How The Dictionary Keeps Up With English

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Linguist Geoff Nunberg argues that the media's decision to bleep or otherwise block out a particular word can result in concealing information the public needs to know. dane_mark/Getty Images hide caption

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Not Fit To Print? When Politicians Talk Dirty, Media Scramble To Sanitize

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Our Language Has 'Interesting Little Wrinkles,' Linguist Says

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Earlier studies have found that children who grow up in houses with a TV on many hours a day learn fewer words than children in households with less TV time. Heleen Sitter/Getty Images hide caption

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Heleen Sitter/Getty Images

New Words With Quieter Background Chatter

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Donald Trump delivered a speech on April 27, 2016 in Washington, D.C. using a teleprompter, a "pivot" in style, after saying he wouldn't use one. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Politics, Pundits And The Problem With The Word 'Pivot'

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Star Trek fans dress as Klingons during the Destination Star Trek event at ExCel on Oct. 3, 2014, in London. Ben A. Pruchnie/Getty Images hide caption

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Is Klingon A Living Language? That's For (Human) Courts To Decide

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