Former Auschwitz guard Reinhold Hanning on the last day of his trial for being an accessory to the murder of 170,000 people at the camp in Nazi-occupied Poland. The 94-year-old was found guilty. Bernd Thissen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernd Thissen/AFP/Getty Images

Guta and Mayer Rak with their daughter, Eda, in 1947. Eda was born in Lodz, Poland, when the Raks briefly returned to their home country after the end of World War II. Courtesy Sabina Rak Neugebauer hide caption

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Courtesy Sabina Rak Neugebauer

For more than 70 years, the false bottom on this mug hid a Holocaust victim's treasures. Mirosław Maciaszczyk/Auschwitz Museum hide caption

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Mirosław Maciaszczyk/Auschwitz Museum

For 70 Years, A Mug In Auschwitz Held A Secret Treasure

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Auschwitz survivor Eva Kor sits in a courtroom in Lueneburg, northern Germany, on April 21, 2015. She testified at the trial of 93-year-old former Auschwitz guard Oskar Groening. Julian Stratenschulte/AP hide caption

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Julian Stratenschulte/AP

'It's For You To Know That You Forgive,' Says Holocaust Survivor

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Former SS guard Oskar Groening, now 93, enters a car after the first day of his trial in Lueneburg, Germany, on Tuesday. He faces 300,000 counts of accessory to murder, in a case that tests the argument that anyone who served at a Nazi death camp was complicit in what happened there. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP