Lindolfo Carballo, an immigrant from El Salvador, meets his son, Raynel, outside school. In El Salvador, he says, families often "teach their boys one thing and their girls differently." He's trying to set a different example for his children. Sarah Tilotta for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Sarah Tilotta for NPR

This hangout spot in East Baltimore — like the rest of the city's outdoor spaces — now comes with a police-enforced nighttime age limit. Children under 14 must be indoors by 9 p.m. each night, all year long. Kids age 14-16 can stay out a little later, until 10 p.m. on school nights and 11 p.m. on other nights. Courtesy of Brian O'Doherty hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of Brian O'Doherty

Amy Myers talks with her son Kamron, 18, in the backyard of their home in Boise, Idaho. She has found raising a teenager to be extremely stressful. Kyle Green for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Kyle Green for NPR

High school students whose friends posted photos of drinking and smoking were about 20 percent more likely to become drinkers or smokers themselves. iStockphoto hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto

In the Institute for the Unsalvageable in Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania, shown here in 1992, children were left in cribs for days on end. Tom Szalay hide caption

itoggle caption Tom Szalay

Being the littlest may mean more protection and care from parents, psychologists say. Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

itoggle caption Getty Images/Image Source

Colleen Frainey, 16, of Tualatin, Ore., cut back on advanced placement classes in her junior year because the stress was making her physically ill. Toni Greaves for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Toni Greaves for NPR

Play now, pay later: consistency matters when it comes to kids and sleep. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

Former NFL offensive lineman Brian Holloway in front of his home in Stephentown, N.Y., which teens trashed earlier this month. Michael Hill/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Michael Hill/AP

Sure you're steamed. But teenagers tend to meet harsh words with even worse behavior, a study says. Katherine Streeter hide caption

itoggle caption Katherine Streeter

A first-year student is greeted upon arrival at University College in Utrecht, Netherlands, on August 16, 2010. Robin Utrecht/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Robin Utrecht/AFP/Getty Images

A gene known as DRD2 affects the brain's dopamine system and is known to be associated with aggressive behavior. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

Laura Molina, 9, shows the mask she created expressing the feeling of "sadness." Her mother is being treated for breast cancer at the Lyndon B. Johnson public hospital in Houston. Carrie Feibel/KUHF hide caption

itoggle caption Carrie Feibel/KUHF