Parenting Parenting

Pam Rector (left) with her daughter Grace became a single mother by choice when she was ready to have a child. Liv Aannestad is expecting her first child in March through the same process, and like all expecting parents she has some questions. Courtesy of Pam Rector/Courtesy of Liv Aannestad hide caption

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Courtesy of Pam Rector/Courtesy of Liv Aannestad

Single Moms By Choice Don't Need To Do It Alone

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Pediatricians realize parents need strategies beyond "Put down that phone!" Jiangang Wang/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Jiangang Wang/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

No Snapchat In The Bedroom? An Online Tool To Manage Kids' Media Use

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Michelle Kondrich for NPR

What Makes For Quality Child Care? It Depends Whom You Ask

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A Pediatrician's View Of Paid Parental Leave

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Iris and Eli Fugate with their 6-month-old son Jack, at the family's home in San Diego. Thanks to California's paid family leave law, Iris was able to take six weeks off when Jack was born, and Eli took three weeks, with plans to take the remaining time over the next few months. Sandy Huffaker for NPR hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker for NPR

How California's 'Paid Family Leave' Law Buys Time For New Parents

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Democrats and Republicans often have trouble seeing one another's perspectives. Researchers think this might be driven in part by their earliest experience of power — the family. James Boast/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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James Boast/Getty Images/Ikon Images

When It Comes To Our Politics, Family Matters

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Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV shot in Corpus Christi, Texas. The vaccine is recommended for 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls. Matthew Busch/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Anthony Merkerson and Charles Jones, on a visit with StoryCorps in New York City. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

From Father To Father, A Few Words Of Wisdom On Raising Kids With Autism

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