Parenting Parenting

Having a narcissistic parent doesn't mean you're going to turn out that way, too. GraphicaArtis/Corbis hide caption

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GraphicaArtis/Corbis

Do Parents Nurture Narcissists By Pouring On The Praise?

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Silvester Fullard fixes dinner for his 11-year-old son Tavestsiar. When Tavestsiar first came to live with his dad in 2010, he was closed off, Silvester says; "he didn't want to be around other kids." Charles Mostoller for NPR hide caption

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Charles Mostoller for NPR

To Head Off Trauma's Legacy, Start Young

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Most parents have a favorite child, psychologists say, even if they try to be fair. Hero Images Inc./Corbis hide caption

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Hero Images Inc./Corbis

When Kids Think Parents Play Favorites, It Can Spell Trouble

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People who practice free-range parenting say it makes kids more independent, but others see it as neglect. State and local laws don't specify what children are allowed to do on their own. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Kids' Solo Playtime Unleashes 'Free-Range' Parenting Debate

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

To Stop Teen Drinking Parties, Fine The Parents

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When It Comes To Day Care, Parents Want All Children Vaccinated

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Phillip Underwood and Michelle Sheridan and their children, Logan and Lilliana, gather in their living room in Frederick, Md., after a long day of work and school. The couple had delayed marriage, in part for financial reasons. James Clark/NPR hide caption

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James Clark/NPR

For More Millennials, It's Kids First, Marriage Maybe

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A recent UCLA study found that screen time could negatively affect children's ability to read emotion. But scientists are still unsure how much screen time is too much for a child. Anatoliy Babiy/iStockphoto hide caption

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Anatoliy Babiy/iStockphoto

Even Techies Limit Their Children's Screen Time

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Sonia Vasquez with her daughter, Tina, during a recent visit with StoryCorps in New York City. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Growing Up Broke Strengthened Daughter's Bond With Working Mom

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Psychologists say spanking and other forms of corporal punishment don't get children to change their behavior for the better. Science Photo Library/Corbis hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Corbis

Dale Conour with his son Quinn, 2. Conour's two children from a previous marriage were already young men when Quinn was born. Rosanne Sax/Courtesy of Dale Conour hide caption

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Rosanne Sax/Courtesy of Dale Conour

Making Fatherhood An Insider's Game: Becoming A Dad, Again, At 49

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