Criminologist Joseph Richardson is skeptical that the federal government alone can solve the data problem for police shootings. "There has to be a more pioneering, innovative approach to doing it," he says. Spotmatik/iStockphoto hide caption

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Kate Teague, a registered nurse at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, in Palo Alto, Calif., holds a premature baby's hand. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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In Caring For Sickest Babies, Doctors Now Tap Parents For Tough Calls
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Diana Venegas, a nursing student at Samuel Merritt University, in Oakland, Calif., takes a patient's blood pressure at a recent health fair at Allen Temple Baptist Church. Adizah Eghan/KQED hide caption

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Dr. Janina Morrison, right, speaks with patient Jorge Colorado and his daughter Margarita Lopez about Colorado's diabetes at the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, and a Democratic colleague have introduced a bill that would require drugmakers and medical device companies to disclose payments made to physician assistants and nurses who can prescribe their products. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As life draws to an end, compassion is more important than food. Kacso Sandor/iStockphoto hide caption

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A Nurse Reflects On The Privilege Of Caring For Dying Patients
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Nurse Issa French with his wife Anita, who's holding a copy of Time magazine's issue devoted to front-line workers. He's earned that title, treating more than 420 Ebola patients. Amy Maxmen for NPR hide caption

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A nurse at the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco protests lack of Ebola preparedness in October. The issue will be the focus of national demonstrations Wednesday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Members of the California Nurses Association rallied in Sacramento, Calif., in May, in anticipation of contract negotiations with Kaiser Permanente that began this fall. April Dembosky / KQED hide caption

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California Nurses' Union Pulls Ebola Into Contract Talks
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Nina Pham, shown here in a 2010 college yearbook photo, became infected with Ebola virus while caring for Thomas Eric Duncan in a Dallas hospital. Courtesy of tcu360.com/AP hide caption

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