Former Supreme Court Associate Justice John Paul Stevens likens making pot illegal to Prohibition. In his new book, Six Amendments, he proposes constitutional changes including a curb on an individual's right to bear arms. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Justice Stevens Talks About Marijuana
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With the Colorado state capitol in the background, Cannabis Cup attendees dance and smoke pot at the annual 4/20 marijuana festival in Denver. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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It's 4:20 On 4/20: Denver Hosts The Cannabis Cup Today
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C. Nash smokes after possession of marijuana became legal in Washington state on Dec. 6, 2012. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Evidence On Marijuana's Health Effects Is Hazy At Best
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The teenage years are the last golden opportunity to build a healthy brain, researchers say. So smoking pot might not be so smart. Tomas Rodriguez/Corbis hide caption

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Marijuana May Hurt The Developing Teen Brain
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Research in mice offers new clues as to why Harold and Kumar were so motivated to get to White Castle. Todd Plitt/Getty Images hide caption

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Truffles are among the many foods infused with THC – the chemical in marijuana that gives you a high — already for sale in Colorado. Luke Runyon/KUNC/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Marijuana-Laced Treats Leave Colorado Jonesing For Food-Safety Rules
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The legalization of marijuana could dry up a revenue stream for police, according to reports. Here, two men share a water pipe underneath the Space Needle shortly after a law legalizing the recreational use of marijuana took effect in Seattle in 2012. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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