Sushi burritos from Washington, D.C., restaurant Buredo. These are delicious, but there's no way they'll earn certification as authentic Japanese cuisine under a new program from the government of Japan. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Frozen tuna lies on the ground at the Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo. The FDA recommends freezing raw fish before serving it in sushi as a way to keep it free of parasites. But as a recent outbreak of Salmonella in the U.S. highlights, freezing doesn't guarantee that raw sushi fish is pathogen-free. Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images hide caption

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Yellowfin tuna; Chinook salmon; lingcod; Pacific halibut. Chang/iStockphoto; Debbi Smirnoff/iStockphoto; via TeachAGirlToFish; Andrea Pokrzywinski/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption Chang/iStockphoto; Debbi Smirnoff/iStockphoto; via TeachAGirlToFish; Andrea Pokrzywinski/Flickr

President Obama shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe before a private dinner at Sukiyabashi Jiro in Tokyo on Wednesday. At Sukiyabashi Jiro, people pay a minimum of $300 for 20 pieces of sushi chosen by the patron, Jiro Ono. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy
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